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SEALS 2021 Conference Program

FINAL SCHEDULE. You may rely on dates and times for scheduling travel.


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Monday, July 26

1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Monday, July 26

Social Media Platforms and Free Expression
In recent years, social media platforms have assumed increasing prominence in society. However, as their influence has expanded, there have been increasing calls for those platforms to regulate and even censor speech, particularly so-called "hate speech" and fake news. This panel will involve a comparative examination of how societies regulate social media platforms and the implications of social media censorship on democratic societies.

Moderator: Professor Eric Segall, Georgia State University College of Law

Speakers: Professor RonNell Andersen Jones, The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law; Professor Jon Garon, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Margaret Hu, Penn State Law; Professor András Koltay, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Faculty of Law and Political Sciences (Hungary), and Rector, National University of Public Service (Hungary); Professor Ronald Krotoszynski, The University of Alabama School of Law; Professor Jon Mills, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law; Professor Seth Oranburg, Duquesne University School of Law; Professor Gary Simson, Mercer University School of Law; Professor Russell Weaver, University of Louisville, Louis D. Brandeis School of Law; Professor Paul Wragg, University of Leeds Faculty of Law (England)


2:45 PM -
3:00 PM

Monday, July 26

Break (sponsored by iDesign)


3:00 PM -
5:00 PM

Monday, July 26

Discussion Group: Incorporating Racial Justice Issues in the Classroom
This discussion group focuses on incorporating racial justice issues in doctrinal courses and throughout the curriculum. Presenters will provide tips, strategies, and coverage/syllabus suggestions to help faculty address racial justice issues in their classroom. We invite additional participants who effectively incorporate these important issues in their own teaching to join the discussion. This discussion group is organized by West Academic Publishing and Foundation Press.

Moderator: Professor Meredith Duncan, University of Houston Law Center

Discussants: Professor Jenny Carroll, The University of Alabama School of Law; Professor Miriam Cherry, Saint Louis University School of Law; Professor Robert Dinerstein, American University, Washington College of Law; Professor Martha Ertman, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law; Professor Lisa Fairfax, University of Pennsylvania Law School; Dean Roger Fairfax, The American University, Washington College of Law; Dean Renee Hutchins, University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law; Professor Joy Radice, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Paula Schaefer, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Dean Benjamin Spencer, William & Mary Law School; Dean Elizabeth Kronk Warner, The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law


3:00 PM -
5:00 PM

Monday, July 26

NEWER LAW PROFESSORS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Time Management for Newer Law Professors

This discussion group will address strategies, tips, and tricks designed to help newer (and older) law professors manage the many competing demands on their time. In particular, discussants will talk about how to craft a productive research and writing schedule while also meeting teaching and service obligations. The discussion group will also address how to manage such other time-intensive activities as preparing to teach a new course, grading, membership on work-intensive committees, and preparing for talks and conferences. The goal of the session is to give participants concrete ideas for increasing productivity while also reducing stress, anxiety, and burnout.

Moderator: Professor Tracy Pearl, The University of Oklahoma College of Law

Discussants: Professor Renee Allen, St. John's University School of Law; Professor Steven Friedland, Elon University School of Law; Professor Jamila Jefferson-Jones, Wayne State University Law School; Professor Joel Mintz, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Christopher Odinet, University of Iowa College of Law; Professor Brie Sherwin, Texas Tech University School of Law; Professor Stacey Tovino, The University of Oklahoma College of Law; Professor Kyle Velte, University of Kansas School of Law


3:00 PM -
5:00 PM

Monday, July 26

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Navigating the Hiring Process

This panel is an important part of the Prospective Law Teachers Workshop, although it is open to all SEALS attendees. It gives the participants the ability to hear from an array of experienced faculty who have served on appointments committees in the past. Panelists discuss strategies to navigate the hiring market for law professors. Topics include the FAR form, the AALS and SEALS hiring initiatives, callbacks, the “job talk,” and post-offer negotiations.

Moderator: Professor Leah Chan Grinvald, Suffolk University Law School

Speakers: Professor Benjamin Cooper, The University of Mississippi School of Law; Professor Brannon Denning, Samford University Cumberland School of Law; Professor Corinna Lain, University of Richmond School of Law; Professor Leandra Lederman, Indiana University Maurer School of Law; Professor Shakira Pleasant, University of Illinois Chicago School of Law


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Monday, July 26

ASPIRING LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Beating the Odds

Much advice and data exist about the preferred pedigree for law teaching. What if you don’t look or sound like the standard applicant? For example: You didn’t go to Harvard or Yale. You’re a first-generation law school graduate. You don’t have a Ph.D. You would represent an underrepresented group in academia. You’re a nonconformist. Maybe you’ve practiced law for a long time. You’re writing but not yet impressively published in the area in which you hope to teach. How can you overcome the odds to make it in academia? This panel explores long-term strategies, alternative paths, fellowships, and hybrid positions.

Moderator: Professor Colin Marks, St. Mary's University School of Law

Discussants: Professor Benjamin Cooper, The University of Mississippi School of Law; Professor Michael Higdon, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Margaret Hu, Penn State Law; Professor Marc Roark, Southern University Law Center; Professor Caprice Roberts, The George Washington University Law School; Professor Anna Scardulla, University of North Carolina School of Law; Professor Charlotte Tschider, Loyola University Chicago School of Law; Professor Gina Warren, University of Houston Law Center; Professor Karen Woody, Washington and Lee University School of Law


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Monday, July 26

WORKSHOP ON ONLINE EDUCATION
Discussion Group: The Business of Online Legal Education—Accreditors and External Stakeholders' Interests in Shaping Online Education

This panel introduces the participants to the wide range of internal and external stakeholders in legal education, including the ABA, educational publishers, technology partners, and others who are both helping the law schools deliver online and hybrid education and who are also shaping the choices available to law schools regarding the tools and environment in which to operate. The program will look at resources for faculty, the growth of online consortiums, issues involving verification of test-takers, and similar considerations.

Moderator: Dean Greg Brandes, St. Francis School of Law

Discussants: Mr. William Adams, American Bar Association Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar; Ms. Sara Berman, AccessLex Institute; Ms. Pamela Siege Chandler, West Academic; Professor Jon Garon, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Mr. Michael Gregory, The BarBri Group; Professor Max Huffman, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law; Mr. John Mayer, CALI (Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction); Professor Rebecca Purdom, Emory University School of Law; Professor Victoria Vanzandt, University of Dayton School of Law


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Monday, July 26

WORKSHOP ON CRIMINAL LAW & CRIMINAL PROCEDURE
Discussion Group: From Police to Prisons: Pandemic & Post-Pandemic Reforms in the Criminal Legal System

This group addresses the possibilities for reforms regarding the wide variety of targets in the criminal legal system that have been drawn into the national spotlight by the protests of 2020 and the pandemic. Our topics include reforms related to the achievement of racial justice, the regulation or restructuring of the police and prosecutors, the strategy of decriminalization, and the impact of COVID19 on criminal prosecutions, including the impact on the right to counsel, the character of court proceedings, and the treatment of prisoners including compassionate release. What reforms are needed? If they are adopted, which ones might be likely to last?

Moderator: Professor Cynthia Alkon, Texas A&M University School of Law

Discussants: Professor Amber Baylor, Columbia Law School; Professor Jancy Hoeffel, Tulane University Law School; Professor Brooks Holland, Gonzaga University School of Law; Professor Neil Sobol, Texas A&M University School of Law; Professor Scott Sundby, University of Miami School of Law; Professor Anna VanCleave, University of Connecticut School of Law


6:00 PM -
7:00 PM

Monday, July 26

New Member Reception
The University of Detroit Mercy School of Law and the University of New Hampshire are the newest members of SEALS. They are hosting this reception to introduce themselves to SEALS.


7:15 PM -
8:00 PM

Monday, July 26

Newcomer Beer-Wine Mixer Sponsored by West Academic
The Hospitality Committee invites all new SEALS attendees and newcomers to Amelia Island to join committee members and other SEALS long-time participants for an informal opportunity to receive information and ask questions about SEALS, the Omni Resort, and Amelia Island.


Tuesday, July 27

8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Tuesday, July 27

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Mock Job Talks (panel # 1)

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock job talks designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as an audience for the mock job talks and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as audience members should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Tuesday, July 27

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Mock Job Talks (panel # 2)

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock job talks designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as an audience for the mock job talks and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as audience members should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Tuesday, July 27

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Mock Job Talks (panel # 3)

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock job talks designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as an audience for the mock job talks and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as audience members should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Tuesday, July 27

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Mock Job Talks (panel # 4)

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock job talks designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as an audience for the mock job talks and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as audience members should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Tuesday, July 27

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Mock Job Talks (panel # 5)

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock job talks designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as an audience for the mock job talks and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as audience members should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Tuesday, July 27

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Mock Job Talks (panel # 6)

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock job talks designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as an audience for the mock job talks and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as audience members should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


10:00 AM -
10:15 AM

Tuesday, July 27

Break (sponsored by Carolina Academic Press)


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Tuesday, July 27

Supreme Court and Legislative Update (Individual Rights)
This panel will focus on individual rights, including freedom of speech, religion issues, and equal protection.

Moderator: Professor Thomas Metzloff, Duke University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Michael Dimino, Widener University Commonwealth Law School; Professor Akram Faizer, Lincoln Memorial University Duncan School of Law; Professor Margaret Hu, Penn State Law; Professor Christopher Lund, Wayne State University Law School; Professor Barry McDonald, Pepperdine University School of Law


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Tuesday, July 27

Discussion Group: Silver Linings Playbook: Lessons Learned During a Pandemic
Participants in this discussion group share the lessons they learned teaching law during the pandemic. The discussion group explores best practices in online and blend-flex learning, challenges of both formats, and critical take-aways from the year. The group also addresses the teaching innovations and experiences that emerged as surprising, important lessons during this challenging year. These innovations and experiences include heightened faculty interest in pedagogy, new ways to connect with students, and teaching strategies that can be transferred to the post-pandemic world. Despite the difficulties, there were several “Silver Linings” from teaching law during the 2020-2021 academic year.

Moderator: Professor Olympia Duhart, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law

Discussants: Professor Tiffany Atkins, Elon University School of Law; Professor Jennifer Bard, Penn State Law; Professor Heather Baxter, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor John Cook, University of North Dakota School of Law; Professor Amanda Foster, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Steven Friedland, Elon University School of Law; Professor Catherine Grosso, Michigan State University College of Law; Professor Brooks Holland, Gonzaga University School of Law; Professor Wendy-Adele Humphrey, Texas Tech University School of Law; Professor Alicia Jackson, Stetson University College of Law; Professor Hugh Mundy, University of Illinois Chicago School of Law; Professor Patricia Perkins, Elon University School of Law; Professor John Rice, Duquesne University School of Law; Professor Nancy Soonpaa, Texas Tech University School of Law


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Tuesday, July 27

ASPIRING LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Screening Interview Demonstrations and Debriefings

This panel exposes aspiring law teachers to the format and content of a typical screening interview through mock screening interviews for doctrinal, clinical, and legal writing positions. Experienced faculty act as mock interviewers, while new members of the academy who have recently been through the rigors of the job hiring market act as mock interviewees. After each interview, the group engages in an in-depth discussion with aspiring law teachers about question content, interviewing styles, and common mistakes made by applicants during screening interviews. Attendees who are not listed as discussants are not required to participate in the mock interviews but are invited to participate fully in the debriefing sessions.

Moderator: Professor Louis Virelli, Stetson University College of Law

Speakers: Professor Miriam Cherry, Saint Louis University School of Law; Professor Christopher Jaeger, New York University School of Law; Professor Anthony Kreis, Georgia State University College of Law; Professor Joy Radice, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Anna Scardulla, University of North Carolina School of Law; Professor Vanessa Zboreak, Elon University School of Law


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Tuesday, July 27

NEWER LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Training Session on Mentoring Law Students

More than ever, law professors are called on to mentor law students. This highly interactive program addresses effective mentoring, including how to establish a relationship with a student while maintaining appropriate boundaries, addressing issues common to modern law students (e.g., managing time, learning to be a self-regulated learner), handling stress (and knowing one's limits and when to refer students for professional help), encouraging students to maintain perspective, exploring areas of law in which a student's talents would best fit and in which that student would have a sense of purpose. The presenters will work in small groups with the audience, perhaps role play, and provide hands on guidance on being an effective mentor.

Moderator: Professor Benjamin Madison, Regent University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Daisy Floyd, Mercer University School of Law; Professor Steven Friedland, Elon University School of Law; Professor Kendall Kerew, Georgia State University College of Law; Professor Jerry Organ, University of St. Thomas School of Law; Professor Carwina Weng, Indiana University Maurer School of Law


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Tuesday, July 27

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: CV Review

Candidates will have their curriculum vitae and FAR entries reviewed by experienced academics in preparation for the teaching market. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as reviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Tuesday, July 27

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: CV Review

Candidates will have their curriculum vitae and FAR entries reviewed by experienced academics in preparation for the teaching market. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as reviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


12:00 PM -
1:00 PM

Tuesday, July 27

Carolina Academic Press Luncheon


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Tuesday, July 27

Discussion Group: Say Her Name: Breonna Taylor—Perspectives on the Breonna Taylor Case
This discussion group explores the intersection of gender, race, class, and policing, particularly relating to the use of lethal force. Women of color are the “invisible man” when it comes to police brutality. This discussion group analyzes the challenges that Black women experience as they live in fear of police brutality. It seeks solutions to reveal and remedy police brutality against women of color, especially relative to lethal force.

Moderator: Professor Mitchell Crusto, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law

Discussants: Professor Jalila Jefferson-Bullock, Duquesne University School of Law; Professor Russell Jones, Southern University Law Center; Professor Cortney Lollar, University of Kentucky College of Law; Professor Chance Meyer, New England Law; Professor Maybell Romero, Tulane University Law School; Professor Seth Stoughton, University of South Carolina School of Law; Professor Howard Wasserman, Florida International University College of Law


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Tuesday, July 27

NEWER LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Teaching Law: The Essentials

The participants, all experienced and excellent teachers, take attendees through many of the foundational stops on the teaching journey. Topics include preparing a course, preparing to teach, and the act of teaching. Sub-topics include syllabus formation, assessment, professional identity formation, how to determine what topics to cover, how to cover those topics, and how to approach teaching whether in live or online format.

Moderator: Professor Olympia Duhart, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law

Speakers: Professor Christine Coughlin, Wake Forest University School of Law; Professor Alicia Jackson, Stetson University College of Law; Professor Howard Katz, Cleveland State University, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law; Professor Nancy Soonpaa, Texas Tech University School of Law


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Tuesday, July 27

Supreme Court and Legislative Update (Administrative, Corporate, and Intellectual Property)
This panel will provide an update on recent U.S. Supreme Court cases in the administrative, corporate, and intellectual property areas.

Moderator: Professor Constance Wagner, Saint Louis University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Akram Faizer, Lincoln Memorial University Duncan School of Law; Professor William Funk, Lewis & Clark Law School; Professor Joan Heminway, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Amy Landers, Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law; Professor Gary Myers, University of Missouri School of Law


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Tuesday, July 27

Pollution and Its Impact on COVID-19, Health, Housing, and Learning
When a 9-year-old girl in London is declared dead from pollution, it makes us wonder how many more children are also being harmed. Pollution kills, and now there is at least one official coroner’s report that “Air Pollution exposure” is the “Medical cause of death.” The first step to resolving any problem is to name it. As Mayor Sadiq Khan of London said, “Toxic air pollution is a public health crisis, especially for our children, Ministers and the previous Mayor have acted too slowly in the past, but they must now learn the lessons from the Coroner's ruling and do much more to tackle the deadly scourge of air pollution in London and across the country.” Reducing pollution will also reduce health disparities, ultimately resulting in improved housing, fewer chronic health conditions, fewer cases of COVID-19, and longer (and better quality) lives. One solution is to regulate cities’ levels of toxic pollution, which may include moving toxic industries out of residential areas. Another is putting in strict pollution controls, as they have done in California. Of course, pollution is not the only factor creating such enormous health disparities, but it is one that many city leaders have ignored. There are many lessons of what not to do that leaders in other cities can learn from. What is the role of law schools in documenting and advocating for greater government intervention in regulating toxic pollution? What are the risks? Can the University be a fair umpire between industrial polluters and the needs of community? What level of responsibility do corporations have for the problem?

Moderator: Professor Tracy Pearl, The University of Oklahoma College of Law

Speakers: Dr. John Gilderbloom, University of Louisville, School of Arts and Sciences, Director, Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods; Professor Irma Russell, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Tuesday, July 27

Bostock v. Clayton County: Causation Analysis
Bostock is a signal SCOTUS case for LGBTQ rights in employment under Title VII. Justice Gorsuch authored the majority opinion, which also introduces new causation standards. This panel will focus on the broad implications of Justice Gorsuch’s “but for” causation analysis to be used in employment discrimination cases, and the implications of his logic to other laws utilizing “but for” causation. In particular, Gorsuch noted that discrimination need not be the “primary factor” in an adverse action but need only be a “but for” cause. The potential implications of his opinion on causation are sweeping across federal laws. AUDIENCE DISCUSSION WELCOME!

Moderator: Professor Melissa Essary, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law

Speakers: Professor Rigel Oliveri, University of Missouri School of Law; Professor Kerri Stone, Florida International University College of Law


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Tuesday, July 27

Discussion Group: Philosophical Perspectives on Freedom of Speech in a Liberal Democracy
Political theorists often argue that a well-functioning democracy requires an informed voting public. But freedom of speech allows the dissemination of deceptive and misleading assertions and outright misrepresentation of facts. How many restrictions of freedom of speech are justified by the need to preserve democracy? Which is the end and which the means? Is the purpose of democratic government the preservation of individual liberty of which freedom of speech is a part or is freedom of speech merely a means to a democratic government that can be restricted as much as necessary to preserve that end? Participants will offer philosophical perspectives on these and related questions.

Moderators: Professor John Anderson, Mississippi College School of Law; Professor Mihailis Diamantis, University of Iowa College of Law; Professor John Hasnas, Georgetown University Law Center

Discussants: Professor Raff Donelson, Penn State Dickinson Law; Professor Paul Gowder, University of Iowa College of Law; Professor Christopher Green, The University of Mississippi School of Law; Professor Jeremy Kidd, Drake University Law School; Professor Joshua Kleinfeld, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law; Professor Ken Levy, Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center; Professor Christopher Lund, Wayne State University Law School; Professor Amy Sepinwall, The Wharton School, The University of Pennsylvania; Professor Will Thomas, University of Michigan Ross School of Business


2:45 PM -
3:00 PM

Tuesday, July 27

Break (sponsored by Carolina Academic Press)


3:00 PM -
5:30 PM

Tuesday, July 27

Discussion Group: How to Assure Effective Formative and Summative Assessment
This discussion group focuses on how best to build formative assessment, effective feedback, realistic time management, and accurate, reliable summative assessment into the online, hybrid, and blended educational experience. Discussants will explore how best to create a course and program that maximizes the formal learning outcomes of the instruction and how it best instills the skills and values essential for developing the next generation of lawyers.

Moderator: Professor Brian Owsley, University of North Texas Dallas College of Law

Discussants: Professor Olympia Duhart, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Jennifer Kinsley, Northern Kentucky University, Salmon P. Chase College of Law; Professor Benjamin Madison, Regent University School of Law; Professor Brian Sites, Barry University, Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law; Professor Susan Stephan, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Victoria Vanzandt, University of Dayton School of Law; Professor Spencer Weber Waller, Loyola University Chicago School of Law


3:00 PM -
5:30 PM

Tuesday, July 27

National Security Law: Recent Trends and Developments
This panel will discuss recent trends and developments in the field of national security law. Topics include recent major cases and statutory changes in national security law, as well as the direction of long-standing national security issues. The panel will also consider how national security law can be incorporated into the law school curriculum outside of formal/traditional national security law courses.

Moderator: Judge Justin Walker, U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit

Speakers: Professor John Cook, University of North Dakota School of Law; Professor Zachary Kaufman, University of Houston Law Center; Professor Melissa Ken, Air Force Academy; Professor Michael Nesbitt, University of Calgary Faculty of Law (Canada)


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Tuesday, July 27

Discussion Group: Planning Forward: Taking the Lessons We Have Learned from Emergency and Planned Distance Education
This panel has brainstormed and compiled 10 lessons learned from both the emergency and planned distance education experiment that each of us participated in since March 2020. These lessons learned have so improved our teaching and our students’ learning experiences that we recommend retaining them in our post-pandemic classrooms. Examples include revising learning objectives and modernizing teaching and assessment methods; dealing with student motivation issues; and balancing asynchronous and synchronous teaching with a return to the physical classroom. We will also discuss teaching with compassion and rigor while avoiding becoming an “On-Demand” teacher, and we will explore some of the challenges both faculty and students will face as we return to a post-pandemic world. The panel is comprised of members of the Association of Legal Writing Directors’ Online/Distance Learning Committee.

Moderator: Professor Christine Rollins, Saint Louis University School of Law

Discussants: Professor Katherine Brem, University of Houston Law Center; Professor Erin Donelon, Tulane University; Professor Michelle Falkoff, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law; Professor Chelsi Hayden, University of Nebraska College of Law; Professor Stevie Leahy, Northeastern University School of Law; Professor Karen Sanner, Saint Louis University School of Law


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Tuesday, July 27

Discussion Group: Lessons Learned from the 2020 Forced Expansion of Online Education
This discussion group brings together faculty with extensive experience teaching online courses to discuss what the dramatic shift to pervasive online education has meant to the methods for online learning and assessment as well as to the institutional governance and accreditation of legal education. The program will incorporate the empirical work of Professor Victoria Sutton, LSSEE, and other data about the 2020 shift into online and hybrid education as well as the experiences of faculty and administrators working to meet the ever-changing demands of legal education delivery.

Moderator: Professor Rebecca Purdom, Emory University School of Law

Discussants: Professor April G. Dawson, North Carolina Central University School of Law; Professor Jack Graves, Syracuse University College of Law; Professor Kathryn Nunez, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Michele Pistone, Villanova University School of Law; Professor Gordon Russell, Lincoln Memorial University, Duncan School of Law; Professor Brian Sites, Barry University, Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law; Professor Lisa Smith-Butler, Charleston School of Law; Professor Vickie Sutton, Texas Tech University School of Law


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Tuesday, July 27

ASPIRING LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Designing Your Teaching Package

This discussion group offers advice on determining your areas of teaching and research interests. The session explores the importance of connection to your research, passion, and expertise. Topics include how to articulate these connections and show flexibility. Discussants also weigh how aspirants might consider market demands and advise on how to research, compare, and adjust to varied institutional needs. Finally, the group suggests ways to communicate and develop individualized teaching approaches, including styles, methods, and tools.

Moderator: Professor Kathy Cerminara, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law

Discussants: Professor Benjamin Cooper, The University of Mississippi School of Law; Professor Scott Dodson, University of California Hastings College of the Law; Professor Nicholas Kahn-Fogel, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law; Professor Anthony Kreis, Georgia State University College of Law; Professor Shakira Pleasant, University of Illinois Chicago School of Law; Professor Gary Simson, Mercer University School of Law; Professor Karen Sneddon, Mercer University School of Law; Dean Elizabeth Kronk Warner, The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law


6:30 PM -
7:30 PM

Tuesday, July 27

West Academic Reception


Wednesday, July 28

8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 28

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Mock Interviews

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock interviews designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as mock interviewers and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as mock interviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 28

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Mock Interviews

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock interviews designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as mock interviewers and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as mock interviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 28

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Mock Interviews

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock interviews designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as mock interviewers and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as mock interviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 28

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Mock Interviews

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock interviews designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as mock interviewers and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as mock interviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 28

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Mock Interviews

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock interviews designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as mock interviewers and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as mock interviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 28

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Mock Interviews

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock interviews designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as mock interviewers and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as mock interviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 28

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Mock Interviews

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock interviews designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as mock interviewers and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as mock interviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 28

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Mock Interviews

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock interviews designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as mock interviewers and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as mock interviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 28

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Mock Interviews

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock interviews designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as mock interviewers and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as mock interviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 28

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Mock Interviews

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock interviews designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as mock interviewers and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as mock interviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 28

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Mock Interviews

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock interviews designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as mock interviewers and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as mock interviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 28

PROSPECTIVE LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Mock Interviews

Candidates have the opportunity to participate in mock interviews designed to help prepare them for the teaching market. Faculty participants will serve as mock interviewers and provide in-role and out-of-role feedback. (Note: Candidates have been pre-selected prior to the conference as part of a competitive application process. Faculty who are interested to participate as mock interviewers should contact the coordinator.) Coordinator: Professor Leah Grinvald


8:00 AM -
12:00 PM

Wednesday, July 28

Wolters Kluwer Tennis Tournament


8:00 AM -
12:00 PM

Wednesday, July 28

West Academic Golf Tournament


10:00 AM -
10:15 AM

Wednesday, July 28

Break (sponsored by MF Digital Marketing)


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Wednesday, July 28

NEW SCHOLARS WORKSHOP
Criminal Law & Law and Philosophy

This workshop gives New Scholars the opportunity to present a work-in-progress in a welcoming and supportive environment and to receive feedback on their presentation from more senior scholars in their fields. New Scholars are also assigned a mentor. The program is open to junior faculty at member schools. New Scholars are nominated to participate in the New Scholars Workshop by the deans of their respective law schools.

Moderator: Professor David Hague, St. Mary's University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Jonathan Abel, University of California Hastings College of the Law, Criminal Justice Contact Tracing (Mentor: Jancy Hoeffel, Tulane Law School); Professor Alex Nunn, University of Arkansas School of Law, Jurisdictional Elements and the Jury (Mentor: Lauryn Gouldin, Syracuse University College of Law); Professor Alex Sinha, Quinnipiac University School of Law, The Thin Blue Line Between Virtue and Vice (Mentor: Louis Virelli, Stetson University College of Law)


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Wednesday, July 28

NEW SCHOLARS WORKSHOP
Criminal Law and Criminal Justice

This workshop gives New Scholars the opportunity to present a work-in-progress in a welcoming and supportive environment and to receive feedback on their presentation from more senior scholars in their fields. New Scholars are also assigned a mentor. The program is open to junior faculty at member schools. New Scholars are nominated to participate in the New Scholars Workshop by the deans of their respective law schools.

Moderator: Professor Patrick Metze, Texas Tech University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Ashley Chase, Stetson University College of Law, The Parameters of Precedent: Bounds, Casey, the Internet, and the Potential for Criminal Defendants to Have True Access to Justice (Mentor: Cynthia Alkon, Texas Tech University School of Law); Professor Shawn Fields, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law, Weaponizing Racial Fear: Policing White Spaces in America (Mentor: Mitch Crusto, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law); Professor Alexandra Klein, Washington and Lee University School of Law, Volunteering to Kill (Mentor: Corrina  Lain, University of Richmond School of Law)


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Wednesday, July 28

Discussion Group: Dean's Only Roundtable
In this deans-only roundtable, deans will discuss the particular issue they face heading out of the pandemic. Particular topics may include reenergizing advancement, sustaining faculty engagement and changes in legal education.

Discussants: Dean Michael Barry, South Texas College of Law Houston; Dean Megan Carpenter, University of New Hampshire School of Law; Dean Joshua Paul Fershee, Creighton University School of Law; Dean Daniel M. Filler, Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law; Dean Deidre Keller, Florida A&M University College of Law; Dean Matthew Lyon, Lincoln Memorial University Duncan School of Law; Dean Carla Pratt, Washburn University School of Law


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Wednesday, July 28

NEW SCHOLARS WORKSHOP
Corporate Law, Financial Markets, and Taxation I

This workshop gives New Scholars the opportunity to present a work-in-progress in a welcoming and supportive environment and to receive feedback on their presentation from more senior scholars in their fields. New Scholars are also assigned a mentor. The program is open to junior faculty at member schools. New Scholars are nominated to participate in the New Scholars Workshop by the deans of their respective law schools.

Moderator: Professor Mark Drumbl, Washington and Lee University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Nicole Iannarone, Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law, Faux Transparency (Mentor: Constance Wagner, St. Louis University School of Law); Professor Carla Reyes, SMU Dedman School of Law, Limited Liability DAOs for Regular People (Mentor: James Gibson, University of Richmond School of Law)


12:00 PM -
1:30 PM

Wednesday, July 28

New Scholars Luncheon (sponsored by Wolters Kluwer)


12:00 PM -
1:30 PM

Wednesday, July 28

Call for Papers Luncheon (sponsored by ETS)
This luncheon is being held to honor the winners of SEALS' annual Call for Papers competition. Admission ticket required.

Moderator: Professor Ronald Rychlak, The University of Mississippi School of Law

Speakers: Professor Andrew Hammond, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law, Territorial Exceptionalism and the American Welfare State; Professor Leandra Lederman, Indiana University Maurer School of Law, The Fraud Triangle and Tax Evasion; Professor James Macleod, Brooklyn Law School, Finding Original Public Meanings


1:30 PM -
3:15 PM

Wednesday, July 28

NEWER LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Scholarship Fundamentals: Becoming a Productive and Fulfilled Scholar

This group of experienced scholars considers what is, and how to develop, a “scholarly agenda,” the alternate routes to tenure and self-fulfillment, using colleagues and research assistants to help in the scholarly enterprise, the art or luck of publishing “well,” the importance of presenting at conferences, and how to enjoy, and not dread, the scholarly process. The discussion includes the “nuts and bolts” of writing – where, when, what, and more. The group may break into smaller groups to discuss these issues with participants in depth in a more directed dialogue.

Moderator: Professor Colin Marks, St. Mary's University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Joel Mintz, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Anne Mullins, Stetson University College of Law; Professor Saurabh Vishnubhakat, Texas A&M University School of Law


1:30 PM -
3:15 PM

Wednesday, July 28

"Who, me? I'm not racist!": Addressing Implicit Bias in Legal Education
This panel focuses on the problem of implicit bias and efforts to address implicit bias in law schools. "Implicit bias" refers to attitudes or stereotypes towards people or events that affect one's understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. Indeed, implicit bias is often unrecognized and is distinct from overt racism. The discussants address the topic from a range of perspectives, including improving access to legal education, addressing implicit bias within a law school, educating about implicit bias on an institutional level, and managing the effects of implicit bias from the perspective of those who experience it in their daily lives.

Moderator: Professor Allison Martin, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Speakers: Ms. Sara Berman, AccessLex Institute; Professor Iva Ferrell, Delaware Law School; Professor Shailini George, Suffolk University Law School


1:30 PM -
3:15 PM

Wednesday, July 28

ASPIRING LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
What's in a Job Talk

Panelists offer advice on best practices for job talks. They consider ideals such as authenticity, expertise, clarity, and delivery. They also examine how to harness key points from your work into digestible, yet provocative content that best showcases your ideas and what you bring to the intellectual discourse. Job talks not only forecast the scholar you are and will become but also model the type of teacher you will be. Discussants provide tips on how to handle tough questions from the faculty during your talk.

Moderator: Professor Karen Sneddon, Mercer University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Meghan Boone, Wake Forest University School of Law; Professor Naomi Cahn, University of Virginia School of Law; Professor Scott Dodson, University of California Hastings College of the Law; Professor Christopher Lund, Wayne State University Law School; Professor Christopher Odinet, University of Iowa College of Law


1:30 PM -
3:15 PM

Wednesday, July 28

NEWER LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Assessment and Feedback Across the Curriculum

This panel offers an introduction to assessment and feedback across the law school curriculum, from 1L skills and doctrinal courses to upper-level seminars and skills courses. Each speaker offers an introduction to assessment and feedback challenges and goals for a specific law-student audience. Next, break-out groups meet and use hands-on exercises to exemplify and discuss effective assessment and feedback.

Moderator: Professor Tim Duff, Suffolk University Law School

Speakers: Professor Dustin Benham, Texas Tech University School of Law; Professor Alex Pearl, The University of Oklahoma College of Law; Professor Tracy Pearl, The University of Oklahoma College of Law; Professor Nancy Soonpaa, Texas Tech University School of Law


1:30 PM -
3:15 PM

Wednesday, July 28

Initial Thoughts on Law Schools of 2050—An Academic Master Plan for the Future
Legal educators have bemoaned many of the challenges to modern legal education and the legal profession, including the cost of legal education, the scale of unmet legal needs, the limited scope of live-client legal education, the use of entrance tests for admission, the use of seat-time to measure progress, the lack of competency-based academic measurement, and many, many more concerns. The discussant will identify ideal traits for legal education in the law school(s) of 2050, the actions needed to create those changes, and the strategies needed to begin the process of change.

Moderator: Professor Jon Garon, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law

Speakers: Mr. William Adams, American Bar Association Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar; Dean Megan Carpenter, University of New Hampshire School of Law; Professor Jane Cross, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Jack Graves, Syracuse University College of Law; Dean Hari Osofsky, Penn State Law; Professor Rebecca Purdom, Emory University School of Law; Professor Gordon Russell, Lincoln Memorial University, Duncan School of Law; Dean Kellye Testy, Law School Admission Council


3:15 PM -
3:30 PM

Wednesday, July 28

Break (sponsored by the American Bar Association)


3:30 PM -
6:00 PM

Wednesday, July 28

WORKSHOP ON ONLINE EDUCATION
Discussion Group: Practical Considerations for Online, Hybrid, and Blended Instruction

This discussion group explores the lessons learned and the challenges still faced in developing and teaching engaged classes across all variety of modalities, including asynchronous and synchronous online courses, hybrid courses involving students participating simultaneously in both the face-to-face and online modalities, and courses with both significant face-to-face and online components. The discussions will include the development of safe classrooms that promote student-affirmative engagement; the difficulty of translating seat-time credit hour calculations to other modalities; and methods for improving the universal progress of all students.

Discussants: Dean Greg Brandes, St. Francis School of Law; Professor William Byrnes, Texas A&M University School of Law; Professor April G. Dawson, North Carolina Central University School of Law; Professor Samuel Farkas, The BarBri Group, Vice President of Instruction & Online Education; Professor Kathryn Nunez, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Michele Pistone, Villanova University School of Law; Professor Rebecca Purdom, Emory University School of Law; Professor Victoria Vanzandt, University of Dayton School of Law


3:30 PM -
6:00 PM

Wednesday, July 28

WORKSHOP ON LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW
Discussion Group: Work in the Digital Age

This discussion group examines the impact of technology on the workplace and the laws that govern it. Innovations such as gig work platforms, virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and data analytics are already changing the workplace in significant ways and will increasingly do so in the future. Labor and employment laws, however, have not kept up with these changes and are liable to fall behind further as technology affects various issues, including job losses, changes in how work is performed, classification of workers, employment discrimination, privacy, disabilities, and health and safety.

Moderator: Professor Miriam Cherry, Saint Louis University School of Law

Discussants: Professor Brad Areheart, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Jason R. Bent, Stetson University College of Law; Professor Richard Carlson, South Texas College of Law Houston; Professor Deepa Das Acevedo, University of Pennsylvania Law School; Professor Charlotte Garden, Seattle University School of Law; Professor Jeffrey Hirsch, University of North Carolina School of Law; Professor Nicole Porter, University of Toledo College of Law; Professor Kerri Stone, Florida International University College of Law


3:30 PM -
6:30 PM

Wednesday, July 28

NEW SCHOLARS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Your Next Article

Is my next idea one that will become a good article? Which idea should I focus on? I’ve done some initial research; where do I go now? Shall I take a different approach? These are common questions that new (and even experienced) scholars ask themselves as they progress with developing an idea into an article. The primary purpose of this panel is to provide New Scholars with input on the direction and development of their scholarship. It offers New Scholars an opportunity to present a developing piece or a few ideas about potential projects in an informal setting and receive feedback on their ideas. Additionally, this discussion group explores motivation, creativity, and the process for finding your next great idea.

Moderator: Professor Christopher Lund, Wayne State University Law School

Discussants: Professor Shawn Fields, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law; Professor Nicole Iannarone, Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law; Professor Young Ran (Christine) Kim, The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law; Professor Carla Reyes, SMU Dedman School of Law; Professor Daniel Schaffa, University of Richmond School of Law


3:30 PM -
6:30 PM

Wednesday, July 28

Discussion Group: Black Lawyers Matter
In response to highly controversial, publicized police killings, the Black Lives Matter Movement’s demand for racial justice is reverberating throughout our institutions, particularly in the Ivy Towers of academia. In response to this inflection point, university, and particularly law school, leadership has stepped up, committing time and resources to addressing systemic racism. This Discussion Group focuses on what law schools are doing and could be doing to purposefully create the next generation of Black lawyers. First, it identifies the current obstacles that Black students face in obtaining a law degree and it recognizes that past and present strategies have yet to maximize the talent in those seeking to become lawyers. Second, it proposes the Black Lawyers Matter Code (BLMC), a concrete action plan/model that law schools should adopt to bring about transformative change in successfully educating Black lawyers. And third, it argues why the BLMC will produce its stated goal and is good policy to address systemic racism.

Moderator: Professor Mitchell Crusto, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law

Discussants: Professor Nicky Boothe-Perry, Florida A&M University College of Law; Professor Kevin Brown, Indiana University, Maurer School of Law; Professor Kevin R. Douglas, Michigan State University College of Law; Professor Maurice Dyson, Suffolk University Law School; Mr. Blaine Lecesne, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law, , Associate Dean for Equity and Inclusion; Professor Timothy Lovelace, Duke University School of Law; Professor Masai McDougall, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law; Professor Richard Winchester, Seton Hall University School of Law


3:30 PM -
6:30 PM

Wednesday, July 28

ASPIRING LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Mapping Academic Opportunities

This discussion group explores how to research the legal academic job hiring market and position yourself for the job. Speakers explain the core components of an academic’s life: teaching, scholarship, and service. The discussion includes the variety of legal academic positions and tradeoffs. It examines the importance of considering the distinct cultures and goals of law schools that are hiring. Speakers address how to build experience and prepare your curriculum vita and academic record to compete in the academic market. They also address myths of the market and tips for how to avoid pitfalls in seeking a law faculty position.

Moderator: Professor Joan Heminway, The University of Tennessee College of Law

Discussants: Professor Valena Beety, Arizona State University College of Law; Professor Meghan Boone, Wake Forest University School of Law; Professor Darren Bush, University of Houston Law Center; Professor andré douglas pond cummings, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law; Dean Brian Gallini, Willamette University College of Law; Professor Jamila Jefferson-Jones, Wayne State University Law School; Professor Colin Marks, St. Mary's University School of Law; Professor Seema Mohapatra, SMU Dedman School of Law


3:30 PM -
6:30 PM

Wednesday, July 28

Discussion Group: New Perspectives in Technology Law and Intellectual Property
This discussion group provides an opportunity for junior scholars whose research interests span technology law and intellectual property to discuss their works-in-progress among peers with similar scholarly interests. The participants’ works cover a wide range of perspectives and methodologies to uncover new insights that may expand our understanding of this fast-moving area of the law and analyze its future direction.

Moderators: Professor Lucas Osborn, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law; Professor Saurabh Vishnubhakat, Texas A&M University School of Law

Discussants: Professor Nikola Datzov, University of North Dakota School of Law; Professor Tabrez Y. Ebrahim, California Western School of Law; Professor Emile Loza de Siles, Duquesne University School of Law; Professor Dustin Marlan, University of Massachusetts School of Law; Professor Micky Minhas, University of New Hampshire School of Law; Professor Anthony Volini, DePaul University College of Law


6:00 PM -
7:00 PM

Wednesday, July 28

President's Reception
The University of Kentucky J. David Rosenberg College of Law and St. Mary's University School of Law are co-hosting this reception to honor SEALS' current President, Professor David Brennen, and last year's President, Professor Colin Marks.


Thursday, July 29

8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Thursday, July 29

NEW SCHOLARS WORKSHOP
Corporate Law, Financial Markets, and Taxation II

This workshop gives New Scholars the opportunity to present a work-in-progress in a welcoming and supportive environment and to receive feedback on their presentation from more senior scholars in their fields. New Scholars are also assigned a mentor. The program is open to junior faculty at member schools. New Scholars are nominated to participate in the New Scholars Workshop by the deans of their respective law schools.

Moderator: Professor John Anderson, Mississippi College School of Law

Speakers: Professor Catherine Baylin Duryea, St. John's University School of Law, Crumbs of Judicial Relief: Judicial Review of Price Controls During Wartime (Mentor: Eric Segall, Georgia State University College of Law); Professor Young Ran (Christine) Kim, The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, Taxing Telework (Mentor: Tessa Davis, University of South Carolina School of Law); Professor Jennifer Levine, Quinnipiac University School of Law, Qualified Small Business Stock: A Proposal for Reform to Promote Business Formation and Growth (Mentor: Joan Heminway, University of Tennessee College if Law); Professor Daniel Schaffa, University of Richmond School of Law, Payroll Subsidies as a Policy Tool (Mentor: Colin Marks, St. Mary's University School of Law)


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Thursday, July 29

NEW SCHOLARS WORKSHOP
Federal and State Courts

This workshop gives New Scholars the opportunity to present a work-in-progress in a welcoming and supportive environment and to receive feedback on their presentation from more senior scholars in their fields. New Scholars are also assigned a mentor. The program is open to junior faculty at member schools. New Scholars are nominated to participate in the New Scholars Workshop by the deans of their respective law schools.

Moderator: Professor Tiffany Graham, University of Touro College, Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Speakers: Professor Marcus Gadson, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law, State Courts and Federal Pleading Standards (Mentor: Thomas Metzloff, Duke Law School); Professor Merritt McAlister, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law, Defining Merit (Mentor: Rigel Oliveri, University of Missouri School of Law)


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Thursday, July 29

NEW SCHOLARS WORKSHOP
Environmental, Economic, and Racial Justice

This workshop gives New Scholars the opportunity to present a work-in-progress in a welcoming and supportive environment and to receive feedback on their presentation from more senior scholars in their fields. New Scholars are also assigned a mentor. The program is open to junior faculty at member schools. New Scholars are nominated to participate in the New Scholars Workshop by the deans of their respective law schools.

Moderator: Professor Zack Buck, The University of Tennessee College of Law

Speakers: Professor Jennifer Breen, Syracuse University College of Law, Caring Work, Women's Work, Essential Work: Reconsidering Comparable Worth as an Approach to Pay Equity for Care Workers (Mentor: Jeffrey  Hirsch, University of North Carolina School of Law); Professor Annie Brett, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law, improving the Environment (Mentor: Linda Malone, William & Mary Law School); Professor Taleed El-Sabawi, Elon University School of Law, People Over Poverty (Mentor: Marc Roark, Southern University Law Center)


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Thursday, July 29

WORKSHOP ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW
Empirical Patent Law

The Empirical Patent Law panel features presentations relating to the empirical analysis of patent law and practice. The panelists' works-in-progress cover multiple aspects of the patent system, including patent litigation, the United States Patent & Trademark Office, and stakeholder strategies. Using a variety of datasets and methodologies, the panelists' works explore assertions, validity, patentability, and related issues. This is a timely discussion, as empirical studies of the patent system have been critical to the current debate on whether more patent reform is necessary.

Moderator: Professor Brian Frye, University of Kentucky College of Law

Speakers: Professor Christopher Ryan, University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law; Professor Amy Semet, University at Buffalo School of Law; Professor Ryan Whalen, National University of Singapore


9:00 AM -
12:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

Discussion Group: Lessons Learned from the Pandemic
This discussion group focuses on lessons learned in response to the pandemic. Topics of discussion will include: how to support faculty and students in the creation and delivery of courses, the production and promotion of scholarship, and the delivery of remote library services. The discussion group addresses the opportunities created by a once-in-a-lifetime disruption to the normal operations of legal education, as well as things we tried during the pandemic but need not repeat.

Moderator: Professor Caroline Osborne, West Virginia University College of Law

Discussants: Professor Elizabeth Adelman, University at Buffalo School of Law; Professor Brian Barnes, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law; Professor Scott Childs, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Michelle Cosby, Temple University, James E. Beasley School of Law; Professor James Donovan, University of Kentucky College of Law; Professor Emily Janoski-Haehlen, University of Akron School of Law; Professor Billie Jo Kaufman, Mercer University School of Law; Professor Anne Klinefelter, University of North Carolina School of Law; Professor Kristina Niedringhaus, Georgia State University College of Law; Professor Jane O'Connell, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law; Professor Beth Parker, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Gordon Russell, Lincoln Memorial University, Duncan School of Law; Professor Roger Skalbeck, University of Richmond School of Law; Professor Leslie Street, William & Mary Law School


9:00 AM -
12:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

WORKSHOP ON DISPUTE RESOLUTION
Discussion Group: Is Remote Justice Still Justice? Shifting Dispute Resolution Processes Online

Due to COVID-19, many dispute resolution processes have shifted to a remote format. This discussion group explores the impact of that shift on facilitation, negotiation, mediation, and arbitration processes, and in specific practice areas, including criminal law and family law. Topics include whether these remote processes achieve just outcomes and how to teach these processes to better prepare students for the future. The discussants share observations and analysis based on their recent experience as advocates, neutrals, and empirical researchers and lessons learned from forcing students to rapidly enhance their technological skills during a period of massive disruption. The program examines how agile particular mechanisms and practice areas have been and whether they have successfully reinvented themselves.

Moderators: Professor Cynthia Alkon, Texas A&M University School of Law; Professor Kelly Browe Olson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law

Discussants: Professor Erin Archerd, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law; Professor Debra Berman, South Texas College of Law Houston; Professor Sarah Cole, The Ohio State University, Moritz College of Law; Professor Deborah Thompson Eisenberg, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law; Professor Elayne Greenberg, St. John's University School of Law; Professor Toby Guerin, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law; Professor Joan Stearns Johnsen, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law; Professor Andrea Schneider, Marquette University Law School


10:00 AM -
10:15 AM

Thursday, July 29

West Academic Mimosa Reception


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

ASPIRING LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: The Art of Self-Promotion

This discussion group explores packaging, marketing, and promotion strategies for your academic reputation and your scholarly ideas. Speakers discuss conventional and controversial methods of enhancing your academic brand. They also address potential pitfalls, including consequences of public ideological battles. Should professors stay in their lane of expertise and maintain professional etiquette? Can professors afford to stay silent? Last, discussants offer tips on how to balance personal and professional interests in social media dissemination.

Moderator: Professor Rachel Gurvich, University of North Carolina School of Law

Discussants: Professor Darren Bush, University of Houston Law Center; Professor Brian Frye, University of Kentucky College of Law; Dean Brian Gallini, Willamette University College of Law; Professor Andy Grewal, University of Iowa College of Law; Professor Anthony Kreis, Georgia State University College of Law; Professor Lucas Osborn, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law; Professor Maybell Romero, Tulane University Law School; Professor Charlotte Tschider, Loyola University Chicago School of Law; Professor Vanessa Zboreak, Elon University School of Law


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

WORKSHOP ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW
New Inquiries in Copyright Law

This panel highlights recent and emerging scholarship in copyright law and its intersections with other legal domains, with technological developments, and with economic and social trends. Panelists present research at varying stages of development and engage with each other's work. Most of the panelists are relatively junior scholars, first-time participants at SEALS, or both.

Moderator: Professor Zvi Rosen, Southern Illinois University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Tesh Dagne, Thompson Rivers University (Canada); Professor Amanda Levendowski, Georgetown University Law Center; Professor Xiyin Tang, University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law; Professor Jacob Victor, Rutgers Law School (Newark)


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

WORKSHOP ON TAX LAW
Tax Law and Policy - International, Federal, State

This panel addresses a variety of issues in tax policy, including the implications of complex sets of relevant tax rules in various contexts and scenarios. Papers included in this panel consider cross-border issues at the local, state, and international levels, as well as questions that arise around the coordination between the IRS and other agencies. Other panelists consider issues around the marriage penalty and the physical presence rules.

Moderator: Professor Richard Winchester, Seton Hall University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Andrew Appleby, Stetson University College of Law; Professor Rebecca Rosenberg, Ohio Northern University, Pettit College of Law; Professor Blaine Saito, Northeastern University School of Law; Professor Eric Smith, Weber State University, School of Business; Professor Adam Thimmesch, University of Nebraska College of Law


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

WORKSHOP ON ADVANCEMENT
Discussion Group: Fundraising Post-COVID

We see the light at the end of the tunnel: the pandemic is almost behind us. Now we can return to our pre-2020 fundraising methods. Or should we? What lessons have we learned from fundraising during the pandemic? This discussion group considers fundraising in a post-COVID world, including new fundraising tools, metrics, and priorities.

Moderator: Ms. Florentina Butler, Washington and Lee University School of Law, Associate Director of Law Advancement

Discussants: Ms. Renee Bush, George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School, Assistant Dean for Development & Alumni Relations; Ms. Tory Gaddy, University of Arkansas School of Law, Director of Development; Mr. Benjamin Ginsberg, University of Pittsburgh School of Law, Director of Development; Assistant Dean Wanda Hoover, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law; Ms. Suzette Matthews, The University of Mississippi School of Law, Senior Director of Development


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

Confident or Crazy: Calling all Potential Deans
This panel brings together several recently appointed deans to discuss what prompted them to consider becoming a dean; how they identified potential schools and prepared themselves to be viable candidates; what the search process is like and how to maximize one’s success; priorities for the first 100 days; and things they wish they’d done differently before, during or after the process.

Moderator: Dean Patricia  Roberts, St. Mary's University School of Law

Speakers: Dean Robert Ahdieh, Texas A&M University School of Law; Dean Michael Barry, South Texas College of Law Houston; Dean Larry Cunningham, Charleston School of Law; Dean Daniel M. Filler, Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law; Dean Eboni S. Nelson, University of Connecticut School of Law; Dean Sean Scott, California Western School of Law; Dean Donald Tobin, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law; Dean Reynaldo Anaya Valencia, Capital University Law School


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

Cultural Self-Awareness & Professional Identity Formation Across the Curriculum

Cognition and culture influence every aspect of human interaction. They inform how people perceive, evaluate, and communicate information. To thrive in practice, then, law students’ socialization to the legal profession should enhance, not undermine, their ability to understand how culture impacts the law, legal relations, and the lawyering process. Developing cultural self-awareness as part of professional identity formation is critical to this socialization. This panel brings together teacher-scholars from across the curriculum to discuss how they integrate cultural self-awareness and professional identity formation in their classrooms.

Moderator: Professor Danielle Tully, Brooklyn Law School

Speakers: Professor Sherley Cruz, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Sarah Schendel, Suffolk University Law School; Professor Mikah Thompson, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law


12:00 PM -
1:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

West Academic Luncheon


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Thursday, July 29

How to Create a Proposal: Best Practices for Marketing, Enrollment, and Instructional Design for Online Legal Masters and Hybrid JD Programs
The online market presents a significant opportunity for law schools to increase their footprints and connect with a new audience of prospective students, yet 26% of all new online programs fail to report a single conferral. In this session, participants will learn how to successfully position programs to compete in the online marketplace. The panel addresses topics such as understanding market research and program viability, successfully breaking through the noise of competitive programs, and designing a program for optimal online delivery. Specific topics include: (1) understanding the market potential, both regional and nationwide; (2) tapping into quality enrollments and target markets; (3) developing processes and understanding emotional decision points necessary to create a program; (4) creating top-tier programs for an online modality and best practices for instructional design using learning theory and law-specific faculty interaction; and (5) ensuring quality student outcomes, assessment, and support.

Moderator: Professor Robert McFarland, Faulkner University, Thomas Goode Jones School of Law

Speakers: Mr. Jared Brueckner, iDesign, Senior Vice President; Mr. Stephen Burnett, All Campus, Law School Advisor; Mr. Jack Harney, All Campus, Senior Director of Strategic Partnerships; Mr. Kyle Shea, All Campus, Executive Vice President, Partnership Development and Co-founder


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Thursday, July 29

WORKSHOP ON TAX LAW
Tax Reform in the 21st Century

This panel brings together tax policy experts from a variety of fields to consider ways the tax law can be reformed. Under consideration are wealth taxes, "tax loopholes", the role of the federal tax system in the taxation of legalized marijuana, and lessons the tax system can learn from pandemic relief. Presenters consider the implications of a variety of tax policy tools on these various topics.

Moderator: Professor Ted Afield, Georgia State University College of Law

Speakers: Professor Jennifer Bird-Pollan, University of Kentucky College of Law; Professor David Gamage, Indiana University Maurer School of Law; Professor Diane J. Klein, University of La Verne College of Law; Professor Andrew Swain, Indiana University Judd Leighton School of Business and Economics; Professor Eleanor Wilking, Cornell Law School


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Thursday, July 29

SCOTUS: Post-RBG
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg served on the U.S. Supreme Court for decades, becoming a pop-culture feminist icon known as "The Notorious RBG." In many but not all opinions, she led the liberal wing of the Court. She authored the majority opinion in the groundbreaking VMI case that gave women the right to attend the previously all-male military school. In many controversial 5-4 opinions, Justice Ginsburg penned impassioned dissenting opinions, which resulted in countless images of her picture with the words, "I dissent." She enjoyed a meaningful friendship, and sometimes unexpected concurring opinions, with Justice Antonin Scalia. This panel explores Justice Ginsburg's rich background, legal career, tenure, and legacy. Panelists also explore the future of the Court after losing RBG and adding Justice Amy Coney Barrett.

Moderator: Professor Michael Dimino, Widener University Commonwealth Law School

Speakers: Professor Renee Knake Jefferson, University of Houston Law Center; Professor Corinna Lain, University of Richmond School of Law; Professor Merritt McAlister, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law; Professor Andrew Siegel, Seattle University School of Law


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Thursday, July 29

Discussion Group: "Wow - that was unexpected!": Deaning in a Time of Crisis
Deans and Associate Deans explore the challenges of the past year, including providing legal education during a pandemic; navigating political, social and racial justice issues with diverse faculty, staff, student and alumni stakeholders; generating philanthropy and revenue despite exhausted team members and fiscal upheaval for agencies, businesses, nonprofits and alumni; escalating costs and uncertain enrollment future; and maintaining a sense of community and hope against the backdrop of all of these challenges. While the discussion will provide a bit of catharsis, the purpose of the discussion group is to share ideas that were most successful in addressing these unexpected crises, and to strategize on building continued resilience as leaders, and among our communities, as we move forward.

Moderator: Dean Patricia  Roberts, St. Mary's University School of Law

Discussants: Dean Robert Ahdieh, Texas A&M University School of Law; Dean Michael Barry, South Texas College of Law Houston; Professor Scott Bauries, University of Kentucky College of Law; Dean Larry Cunningham, Charleston School of Law; Dean Joshua Paul Fershee, Creighton University School of Law; Dean Matthew Lyon, Lincoln Memorial University Duncan School of Law; Professor Colin Marks, St. Mary's University School of Law; Dean Sean Scott, California Western School of Law; Professor Milena Sterio, Cleveland State University, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law; Dean Donald Tobin, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law; Dean Reynaldo Anaya Valencia, Capital University Law School


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Thursday, July 29

WORKSHOP ON BUSINESS LAW
Discussion Group: First Things First: Is Short-Termism the Problem?

Recently, Ernst and Young prepared a “Study on Directors’ Duties and Sustainable Corporate Governance” for the European Commission. The study is based on evidence collected from 1992 to 2018 that seems to show that the boards of directors of publicly held companies within the EU tend to focus on the short-term benefits of shareholders to the detriment of the company’s long-term interests. We discuss the Study on Directors’ Duties and its empirical findings. In the context of a new political and economic order, we discuss what that study means to corporate law and corporate governance in the United States. Finally, we discuss what "short-termism" means, if it exists and, if it does, whether it is as harmful as it sounds.

Moderator: Professor Lécia Vicente, Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center

Discussants: Professor Eric Chaffee, University of Toledo College of Law; Dean Joshua Paul Fershee, Creighton University School of Law; Professor Jill Fisch, University of Pennsylvania Law School; Professor George Georgiev, Emory University School of Law; Professor Joan Heminway, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Florian Moslein, Philipps University Marburg (Germany); Professor Mariana Pargendler, New York University School of Law, & Fundação Getúlio Vargas (FGV) Law School, São Paulo, Brazil ; Professor Paolo Saguato, George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School; Professor Megan Wischmeier Shaner, The University of Oklahoma College of Law; Professor Marcia Weldon, University of Miami School of Law


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Thursday, July 29

WORKSHOP FOR ASSOCIATE DEANS FOR RESEARCH
Discussion Group: Obtaining Funded Research

Moderator: Professor Ronald Krotoszynski, The University of Alabama School of Law

Discussants: Professor Shima Baughman, The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law; Professor Michael Higdon, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Edward Janger, Brooklyn Law School; Professor Linda Jellum, Mercer University School of Law; Professor Melanie Reid, Lincoln Memorial University Duncan School of Law


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Thursday, July 29

WORKSHOP ON ADVANCEMENT
Discussion Group: Building a Culture of Philanthropy

You hear about the importance of a culture of philanthropy, but what does that mean and how do you go about building it? Where do we start? Who does it involve? Should faculty help fundraise? Who else should be on board? This session will offer steps in building or growing a culture of philanthropy at your school.

Moderator: Ms. Tory Gaddy, University of Arkansas School of Law, Director of Development

Discussants: Ms. Florentina Butler, Washington and Lee University School of Law, Associate Director of Law Advancement; Assistant Dean Wanda Hoover, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law; Dean J. Rich Leonard, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law


1:00 PM -
4:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

WORKSHOP ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW
Intellectual Property Law, Culture, and Race

Recent scholarship has started to critically analyze the impact that intellectual property rights have on culture and race. Do intellectual property laws affect what type of cultural expressions are worthy of protection? Does race play a part in who benefits from intellectual property rights? What should the governance structure for the cultural expressions and traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples and local communities look like? The panel explores these questions, the answers to which may have significant implications, including the need to reform existing laws or justifying the creation of new systems in domestic and international intellectual property law.

Moderator: Dean Deidre Keller, Florida A&M University College of Law

Speakers: Professor Leah Chan Grinvald, Suffolk University Law School; Professor Christine Haight Farley, American University, Washington College of Law; Professor Aman K. Gebru, Duquesne University School of Law; Professor Janewa Osei-Tutu, Florida International University College of Law; Professor Trevor Reed, Arizona State University College of Law


2:45 PM -
3:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

Break (sponsored by Fast Case)


3:00 PM -
5:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

WORKS-IN-PROGRESS WORKSHOP
Legal Research and Writing

This workshop gives participants the opportunity to present a work-in-progress and receive feedback on their work.

Moderator: Professor Gail Stephenson, Southern University Law Center

Speakers: Professor Michael Blasie, Penn State Dickinson Law, The Law, Policies, Effects, and Risks That Mandate Versatile Writing; Professor Marissa Meredith, Duquesne University School of Law, Proposing a Domestic Violence Registry; Professor Anne Mullins, Stetson University College of Law, A New Rhetorical Framework for Judicial Rhetoric; Professor Maria Termini, Brooklyn Law School, Accentuate to the Negative? Whether and When to Use Negation and Negative Framing; Professor Tara Willke, Duquesne University School of Law, Legal Analysis, Signals, and Legal Writing: Making the Connections


3:00 PM -
5:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

Discussion Group: Advice for Newer Law Professors from Law School Deans
This discussion group will bring together a panel of experienced deans to give their perspective on issues common to newer professors. These include things like juggling multiple service requests, navigating faculty meetings, setting reasonable expectations of availability with students, and evaluating advice from all the many people who will want to provide it. There will be ample opportunity for individual questions and for breaking into smaller groups.

Moderator: Dean Gregory Bowman, Roger Williams University School of Law

Discussants: Dean Robert Ahdieh, Texas A&M University School of Law; Dean Michael Barry, South Texas College of Law Houston; Dean April Barton, Duquesne University School of Law; Dean Richard Bierschbach, Wayne State University Law School; Dean Greg Brandes, St. Francis School of Law; Dean Megan Carpenter, University of New Hampshire School of Law; Dean Joshua Paul Fershee, Creighton University School of Law; Dean Brian Gallini, Willamette University College of Law; Dean Ian Holloway, University of Calgary Faculty of Law (Canada), Council of Canadian Law Deans; Dean Deidre Keller, Florida A&M University College of Law; Dean Browne Lewis, North Carolina Central University School of Law; Dean Eboni S. Nelson, University of Connecticut School of Law; Dean Patricia E. Roberts, St. Mary's University School of Law; Dean Laura Rosenbury, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law; Dean Reynaldo Anaya Valencia, Capital University Law School


3:00 PM -
5:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

WORKSHOP ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW
Tensions Within Law & Technology

This panel addresses tensions within law and technology. Specifically, it addresses how the law should change or tensions that technology has created, or will create, for law and society. Technology applications include artificial intelligence (AI), cybersecurity, data privacy, digital platforms, and Internet of Things (IoT), among others. Panelists will discuss whether reform is needed to current rules and the potential impact to businesses and society.

Moderator: Professor Tabrez  Ebrahim, California Western School of Law

Speakers: Professor Stacy-Ann Elvy, University of California, Davis, School of Law; Professor James Gibson, University of Richmond School of Law; Professor Connie Nichols, Baylor University Law School; Professor Eric Priest, University of Oregon School of Law; Professor W Keith Robinson, Wake Forest University School of Law; Professor Harry Surden, University of Colorado Law School


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

WORKSHOP ON ONLINE EDUCATION
Discussion Group: Online & Hybrid Learning Pedagogy Best Practices and Standards Development

The discussants will lead an audience conversation: “Since the publication of the 2015 best practices and model recommendations, what have we learned? What should the community be considering now?” Our goal for this discussion is to test whether there is an appetite for an updated set of best practice standards and model rules. Example discussion points include: How should the ABA and regional accreditors review online law classes? How should the accreditation standards consider non-JD online offerings? Some law schools report status differences between faculty who teach online and residential classes; how should this status difference be approached? Some law schools heavily use adjuncts to teach online law classes; is this a problem, and if so, what steps should be taken?

Moderators: Professor William Byrnes, Texas A&M University School of Law; Professor Rebecca Purdom, Emory University School of Law

Discussants: Dean April Barton, Duquesne University School of Law; Ms. Sara Berman, AccessLex Institute; Professor Samuel Farkas, The BarBri Group, Vice President of Instruction & Online Education; Professor Jon Garon, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Jack Graves, Syracuse University College of Law; Professor Jennifer Kinsley, Northern Kentucky University, Salmon P. Chase College of Law; Professor Lisa Smith-Butler, Charleston School of Law; Professor Vickie Sutton, Texas Tech University School of Law; Professor Victoria Vanzandt, University of Dayton School of Law


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

Discussion Group: Professional Responsibility in Our Turbulent Times
Many of the events over the last few years have had significant professional responsibility ramifications. This discussion group addresses such topics as the impact of COVID-19 on legal ethics (including any changes that might be considered to the Model Rules of Professional Conduct); possible changes to professional ethics rules that might make the profession more inclusive and better able to serve the diverse population of the United States; professional responsibility issues that have arisen in the political sphere; and ways in which such issues might best be brought into the professional responsibility classroom or other courses. Participants have the opportunity to discuss their own research, as well as get feedback on potential ideas for scholarly projects.

Moderator: Professor John Cook, University of North Dakota School of Law

Discussants: Professor Elizabeth Chambliss, University of South Carolina School of Law; Professor Benjamin Cooper, The University of Mississippi School of Law; Professor Martin Edwards, Belmont University College of Law; Professor Renee Knake Jefferson, University of Houston Law Center; Professor Kate Kruse, Mitchell Hamline School of Law; Professor Kenneth Lewis, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Alex Long, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Thomas Metzloff, Duke University School of Law; Professor John Rice, Duquesne University School of Law; Professor Paula Schaefer, The University of Tennessee College of Law


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

WORKSHOP ON TAX LAW
Discussion Group: Tax Law and Policy in the 21st Century

Congress and the Biden administration are working hard to institute a series of tax reforms in a variety of different areas. This discussion group considers a variety of issues raised in the tax reform arena. Members of the discussion group consider both reforms already enacted by Congress and alternative proposals that either may still be enacted or should have been enacted. In addition, participants consider a variety of topics at the subnational and international level that contribute to the overall improvement of the tax policy arena.

Moderator: Professor Jennifer Bird-Pollan, University of Kentucky College of Law

Discussants: Professor Ted Afield, Georgia State University College of Law; Professor Andrew Appleby, Stetson University College of Law; Professor Neil Buchanan, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law; Professor Gary Lucas, Texas A&M University School of Law; Professor Kathy Moore, University of Kentucky College of Law; Professor Rebecca Rosenberg, Ohio Northern University, Pettit College of Law; Professor Andrew Swain, Indiana University Judd Leighton School of Business and Economics; Professor Phyllis Taite, Florida A&M University College of Law; Professor Richard Winchester, Seton Hall University School of Law


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Thursday, July 29

NEW SCHOLARS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Your Next Article

Is my next idea one that will become a good article? Which idea should I focus on? I’ve done some initial research; where do I go now? Shall I take a different approach? These are common questions that new (and even experienced) scholars ask themselves as they progress with developing an idea into an article. The primary purpose of this panel is to provide New Scholars with input on direction and development of their scholarship. It offers New Scholars an opportunity to present a developing piece or a few ideas about potential projects in an informal setting and to receive feedback on their ideas. Additionally, this discussion group explores motivation, creativity, and the process for finding your next great idea.

Moderator: Professor Missy Lonegrass, Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center

Discussants: Professor Jennifer Breen, Syracuse University College of Law; Professor Annie Brett, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law; Professor Catherine Baylin Duryea, St. John's University School of Law; Professor Taleed El-Sabawi, Elon University School of Law; Professor Marcus Gadson, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law; Professor Alexandra Klein, Washington and Lee University School of Law; Professor Merritt McAlister, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law


Friday, July 30

8:00 AM -
9:00 AM

Friday, July 30

Board of Trustees Meeting


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Friday, July 30

WORKSHOP ON HEALTH LAW
Public Health Law and Covid-19. Where Did We Go Wrong?

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a structural stress test for public health law. The American public has been inundated with confusing guidelines and mandates. The Supreme Court in Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn NY v. Andrew Cuomo , 592 U. S. ____ (2020) struck down New York's restrictions on religious gatherings. The decision shows a major shift in enforcement of constitutional liberties while COVID-19 lingers. It also leads to the conclusion that the federal government and states have not done a very good job of ensuring a strong public health legal system. This panel addresses the mistakes made in the issuing, implementation and enforcement of the public health mandates and guidelines and the lessons learned since the pandemic began.

Moderator: Professor Chris Ogolla, Barry University, Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law

Speakers: Professor Mitchell Crusto, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law; Professor Barbara Pfeffer-Billauer, University of Porto Faculty of Law (Portugal); Professor Michelle Richards, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law; Professor Charlotte Tschider, Loyola University Chicago School of Law


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Friday, July 30

WRITING CONNECTIONS WORKSHOP
Reason on Trial: Interrogating and Disrupting the Legal Writing Canon

This presentation will explain how comparative rhetoric and critical rhetoric can be used to (1) understand the way law perpetuates and reinforces systems of privilege and power; and (2) can be used to interrupt and disrupt existing systems. By critically examining rhetoric and drawing on other rhetoric traditions, we seek to foster more just and equitable ways of thinking about and applying the law. We will demonstrate specific ways that traditional rhetoric (1) silences alternative voices and (2) privileges elite perspectives; reveal how interruption has been deployed to effect change; and discuss how to deploy Indigenous, African Diasporic, Asian Diasporic, and Latinx Rhetoric to create legal discourse in opposition to Western reasoning and analytic paradigms.

Moderator: Professor Kathryn Stanchi, University of Nevada, Las Vegas William S. Boyd School of Law

Speakers: Professor Elizabeth Berenguer, Stetson University College of Law; Professor Lucy Jewel, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Teri McMurtry-Chubb, University of Illinois Chicago School of Law


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Friday, July 30

WORKS-IN-PROGRESS WORKSHOP
Public Law

This workshop gives participants a chance to present a work-in-progress and receive feedback on their work.

Moderator: Professor Stephanie Ledesma, Texas Southern University, Thurgood Marshall School of Law

Speakers: Professor Sasha Coupet, Loyola University Chicago School of Law, Inclusive K-12 Curricula as the Cure for What Ails Us; Professor Heidi Gilchrist, Brooklyn Law School, Universal Jurisdiction in Germany: No Hiding From Justice; Professor Jeffrey Parness, Northern Illinois University College of Law, Eliminating Mothers and Fathers Under U.S. Laws; Professor Cora True-Frost, Syracuse University College of Law, Harmony and Dissonance at the Intersection of International Human Rights Law


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Friday, July 30

WORKS-IN-PROGRESS WORKSHOP
Administrative Law

This workshop gives participants a chance to present a work-in-progress and receive feedback on their work.

Moderator: Professor Douglas Williams, Saint Louis University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Emily Bremer, Notre Dame Law School, The Captured Roots of Agency Rulemaking; Professor Amy Gaudion, Penn State Dickinson Law, Shifting the Oversight Lens to Reform the U.S. Government's Vulnerabilities Equities Process; Professor Bijal Shah, Arizona State University Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Constitutionality of Presidential Action; Professor Saurabh Vishnubhakat, Texas A&M University School of Law, Constitutional Structure in the Patent Office


8:00 AM -
11:00 AM

Friday, July 30

ASPIRING LAW TEACHERS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Crafting Your Scholarship Goals

This discussion group addresses the value of scholarship. Topics include how to develop best writing practices and balance commitments. Speakers explore various types of writing from opinion-editorials and blogs to journal articles and manuscripts. This group examines benchmarks for quality and quantity including length, type of research, and placements. Speakers offer advice for how to create a thoughtful, clear research agenda. The discussants also consider how to evaluate different publication opportunities and offer advice on how to maintain your voice as you seek to meet institutional and editorial norms.

Moderator: Professor Marc Roark, Southern University Law Center

Discussants: Professor andré douglas pond cummings, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law; Professor Jamila Jefferson-Jones, Wayne State University Law School; Professor Nicholas Kahn-Fogel, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law; Professor Layne Keele, Faulkner University, Thomas Goode Jones School of Law; Professor Anthony Kreis, Georgia State University College of Law; Professor Nancy Leong, University of Denver, Sturm College of Law; Professor Katherine Macfarlane, Southern University Law Center; Professor Portia Pedro, Boston University School of Law; Professor Maybell Romero, Tulane University Law School; Professor Karen Sneddon, Mercer University School of Law; Professor Louis Virelli, Stetson University College of Law; Professor Michael Vitiello, University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law


9:00 AM -
12:00 PM

Friday, July 30

Discussion Group: T&E Pedagogy: Pushing Boundaries
Trusts & Estates, as an area of law, has a reputation for being old-fashioned and very much tied to the past. Trusts & Estates professors, however, have pushed boundaries in their classrooms by (a) harnessing the power of technology, especially over the past year; (b) using experiential learning; and (c) considering how to incorporate issues of race, gender, class, and culture. This discussion will explore learning goals, techniques, assessments, and other ideas for pushing these and other boundaries in the Trusts & Estates classroom.

Moderator: Professor Karen Sneddon, Mercer University School of Law

Discussants: Professor Julia Belian, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law; Professor Emily Grant, Washburn University School of Law; Professor Victoria J. Haneman, Creighton University School of Law; Professor Carla Spivack, Oklahoma City University School of Law; Professor Allison Tait, University of Richmond School of Law; Professor Phyllis Taite, Florida A&M University College of Law; Professor Patrick Tolan, Western Michigan University Cooley Law School; Professor Reid Weisbord, Rutgers Law School (Newark)


9:00 AM -
12:00 PM

Friday, July 30

WORKSHOP ON REMEDIES
Discussion Group: Remedies and Statutes

Discussants examine the intersection of remedies and statutes for sources and limits of power. To what extent are congressional efforts effective in discerning among remedies, operationalizing goals, and creating limits? Discussants also analyze court conformity, interpretation, and resistance to statutory strictures. To what extent do judges retain historic equity power if Congress has not explicitly removed such authority? What if statutory methods of interpretation lead to absurd results? We explore varied civil statutes affecting the SEC, FTC, IP, FCRA, and ACA, as well as other administrative and criminal statutes. These enforcement schemes raise serious issues of remedies, equity, severability, facial challenges, jury trial rights, and justiciability.

Moderator: Professor Caprice Roberts, The George Washington University Law School

Discussants: Professor T. Leigh Anenson, University of Maryland Robert H. Smith School of Business; Professor Jonathan Cardi, Wake Forest University School of Law; Professor Cortney Lollar, University of Kentucky College of Law; Professor Christopher Lund, Wayne State University Law School; Professor Michael T. Morley, Florida State University College of Law; Professor Odeana Neal, University of Baltimore School of Law; Professor Portia Pedro, Boston University School of Law; Professor Christopher Roederer, University of Dayton School of Law; Professor Howard Wasserman, Florida International University College of Law; Professor Russell Weaver, University of Louisville, Louis D. Brandeis School of Law; Professor Vanessa Zboreak, Elon University School of Law


9:00 AM -
12:00 PM

Friday, July 30

Discussion Group: Trending Topics in Health Law and Health Policy
Health law scholars from across a spectrum of health law and policy disciplines share a wide range of emerging scholarship ideas that focus on current legal issues in health law. Topics include health data privacy and HIPAA issues; risks comparisons in biomedical research; prescribing algorithms under the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program; children and health justice; use and application of consumer health technology; statutory and regulatory standards for de-identification of data; drug pricing; disparate impact of public health burdens on women; Second Amendment rights as a public health concern and its effect on race; analysis of the COVID-19 response by developed and developing countries; Stark Law regulatory reforms; experiences of high costs for patients with insurance; telemedicine fraud enforcement; and disclaiming disability, among others.

Moderator: Professor Deborah Farringer, Belmont University College of Law

Discussants: Professor Valarie Blake, West Virginia University College of Law; Professor Zack Buck, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Amy Campbell, UIC Law School; Professor Kelly Dineen, Creighton University School of Law; Professor Leah Fowler, University of Houston Law Center; Dr. John Gilderbloom, University of Louisville, School of Arts and Sciences, Director, Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods; Professor Jessica Mantel, University of Houston Law Center; Professor Seema Mohapatra, SMU Dedman School of Law; Professor Jennifer Oliva, Seton Hall University School of Law; Professor Nicole Porter, University of Toledo College of Law; Professor Ani Satz, Emory University School of Law; Professor Joanna Sax, California Western School of Law; Professor Debra Strauss, Fairfield University Charles F. Dolan School of Business; Professor Nicolas P. Terry, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law; Professor Stacey Tovino, The University of Oklahoma College of Law; Professor Marilyn Uzdavines, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law


9:00 AM -
12:00 PM

Friday, July 30

WORKSHOP ON BUSINESS LAW
Discussion Group: “Contract Creep”: The Legal Treatment of Business Entity Organic Documents as Contracts

In recent years, litigation on a variety of substantive legal matters—from limited liability company bankruptcies to bylaw litigation limits—has raised questions about the legal nature of second-order (i.e., non-chartering) business firm organic documents—corporate bylaws, partnership agreements, and limited liability agreements/operating agreements. Are these important documents contracts, quasi-contracts, or neither? If they are not contracts, should they be treated or interpreted as contracts? And how do the answers to these questions impact the rights and responsibilities of equity holders and others engaged in and with these business associations? This discussion group explores these and other related questions.

Moderator: Professor Joan Heminway, The University of Tennessee College of Law

Discussants: Professor Christopher Bradley, University of Kentucky College of Law; Professor Eric Chaffee, University of Toledo College of Law; Dean Joshua Paul Fershee, Creighton University School of Law; Professor Jeremy Kidd, Drake University Law School; Professor Colin Marks, St. Mary's University School of Law; Professor Benjamin Means, University of South Carolina School of Law; Professor David Rosenfeld, Northern Illinois University College of Law; Mr. Thomas Rutledge, Stoll Kennon Ogden; Professor Christina Sautter, Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center; Professor Megan Wischmeier Shaner, The University of Oklahoma College of Law; Professor Lécia Vicente, Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center


9:30 AM -
12:00 PM

Friday, July 30

Discussion Group: Constitutional Orphan, Paving the Way, Shortlisted, Unequal Profession, We the Women—New Books on Women’s Rights
Several recent books examine the future of women’s rights through different historical lenses: Constitutional Orphan—Gender Equality and the Nineteenth Amendment (Paula Monopoli, Oxford Univ. Press 2020); Paving the Way—The First American Women Law Professors (Herma Hill Kay and Pat Cain, University of California 2021); Shortlisted—Women in the Shadows of the Supreme Court (Renee Knake Jefferson and Hannah Brenner Johnson, NYU Press 2020); Unequal Profession—Race and Gender in Legal Academia (Meera Deo, Stanford 2019); and We the Women—The Unstoppable Mothers of the Equal Rights Amendment (Julie Suk, Skyhorse 2020). This discussion group brings together the authors of these important books with other scholars to consider previously untold stories shaping women’s rights and to identify the work that remains to address inequality.

Moderator: Professor Renee  Jefferson, University of Houston Law Center

Discussants: Professor Patricia Cain, Santa Clara University School of Law; Professor Rebecca Curtin, Suffolk University Law School; Professor Meera Deo, Thomas Jefferson School of Law; Professor Hannah Brenner Johnson, California Western School of Law; Professor RonNell Andersen Jones, The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law; Professor Paula Monopoli, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law; Dean Carla Pratt, Washburn University School of Law; Professor Rebecca Purdom, Emory University School of Law; Dean Laura Rosenbury, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law; Professor Wenona Singel, Michigan State University College of Law; Professor Julie Suk, CUNY School of Law; Professor Gina Warren, University of Houston Law Center


10:00 AM -
10:15 AM

Friday, July 30

Break (sponsored by Carolina Academic Press)


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Friday, July 30

WORKS-IN-PROGRESS WORKSHOP
Constitutional Law

This workshop gives participants the opportunity to present a work-in-progress and to receive feedback on their work.

Moderator: Professor Charles Rhodes, South Texas College of Law Houston

Speakers: Professor Brian Frye, University of Kentucky College of Law, Free Smokey; Professor Anthony Kreis, Georgia State University College of Law, Folk Remedies for a Constitution; Professor Michael T. Morley, Florida State University College of Law, Election Emergencies: Voting in the Wake of War and Pandemic; Professor Mark Rush, Washington and Lee University School of Law, The First Amendment in a Digital Viral World; Professor Miguel Schor, Drake University Law School, American Constitutional Exceptionalism in the Age of Populism; Professor Lee Strang, University of Toledo College of Law, The Virtues of Imperfection; Professor Howard Wasserman, Florida International University College of Law, First Amendment


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Friday, July 30

WORKSHOP ON ADVANCEMENT
Discussion Group: Building an Effective Advisory Board

A highly functioning board can bring additional resources to the table and assist you in achieving your goals. What should the board members’ roles be? How should the group be organized? How often should they meet? Should they fundraise? These questions will be answered and a blueprint offered as you strive to establish best practices for your board.

Moderators: Mr. Benjamin Ginsberg, University of Pittsburgh School of Law, Director of Development; Assistant Dean Wanda Hoover, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law

Discussants: Dean Michael Barry, South Texas College of Law Houston; Professor Theresa Beiner, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law; Ms. Florentina Butler, Washington and Lee University School of Law, Associate Director of Law Advancement; Ms. Tory Gaddy, University of Arkansas School of Law, Director of Development; Dean J. Rich Leonard, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Friday, July 30

WORKSHOP ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW
Tensions in Patent Law

This panel explores and discusses various tensions in patent law and related proposals for reform, including the tension between promoting medical innovation and ensuring adequate access to medicines in the context of a pandemic; and the tension between patent law's goal of accelerating technological growth on the one hand, versus the potential negative psychological and societal effects of technology on the other.

Moderator: Professor Lucas Osborn, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law

Speakers: Professor Stephanie Bair, Brigham Young University, J. Reuben Clark Law School; Professor Jeremy Bock, Tulane University Law School; Professor Andrew C. Michaels, University of Houston Law Center; Professor Sean Tu, West Virginia University College of Law


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Friday, July 30

WRITING CONNECTIONS WORKSHOP
Curriculum Changes Caused by COVID-19: What We Love, and What We Love to Hate

Many of us were traditionalists before the COVID-19-induced switch to a virtual classroom. This panel, made up of members of the Association of Legal Writing Directors' Online/Distance Education Committee, will discuss curriculum changes to both skills and doctrinal courses brought on by the move to the virtual classroom. Some we love, and some we love to hate. But many of the changes are here to stay. The panel will discuss those changes in the context of their suitability to our current Gen-Z cohort of students, and their relation to current ABA standards governing law school teaching and assessment.

Moderator: Professor Ericka Kelsaw, Texas Southern University, Thurgood Marshall School of Law

Speakers: Professor Catherine Cameron, Stetson University College of Law; Professor Ericka Curran, University of Dayton School of Law; Professor Joy Herr-Cardillo, University of Arizona College of Law; Professor Christine Rollins, Saint Louis University School of Law


12:00 PM -
1:30 PM

Friday, July 30

Steering Committee Luncheon (sponsored by BarBri Legal Education)
Each member and affiliate school is invited to send one representative to this luncheon.


1:30 PM -
3:15 PM

Friday, July 30

Team Based Learning for International Collaboration, Simultaneous and Otherwise.
The SEALS Global Outreach Committee is hosting a panel on Team Based Learning for International Collaboration. This panel discusses the benefits of international collaboration in online classes and discusses ways various professors have incorporated innovative ways to teach comparative law, international law, comparative criminal procedure, constitutional law, and administrative law using "team-based learning." International collaboration excites many students all without leaving the comfort of home. Participants from the U.S. and E.U. will attend and participate to discuss future collaborations.

Moderator: Dean Joshua  Fershee, Creighton University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Class Friedrich Germelmann, University of Hanover Faculty of Law (Germany), & Faculty Coordinator for International Relations; Professor Patrick Hugg, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law; Professor Arndt Kuennecke, Federal University of Applied Sciences for Public Administration (Bruehl, Germany); Professor Dimitrios Parashu, University of Hanover Faculty of Law (Germany); Professor Melanie Reid, Lincoln Memorial University Duncan School of Law


1:30 PM -
3:15 PM

Friday, July 30

WRITING CONNECTIONS WORKSHOP
Balance in the Age of Covid-19

This panel will explore how legal writing faculty members have sought and achieved balance in the age of COVID-19. With this pandemic raging in the midst of civil unrest and political transitions, it has become harder to find and achieve personal and professional balance. In times of social distancing, our homes have become our offices and classrooms. Achieving balance is a highly personalized experience that requires looking at the variety of roles each of us plays in our families, communities, classrooms, and institutions. For these reasons, the panelists will share their personal experiences in seeking balance during these trying times with the hope of providing guidance to others searching for balance moving forward.

Moderator: Professor Suzanna Geiser, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law

Speakers: Professor Jane Cross, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Brenda Gibson, Wake Forest University School of Law; Professor Sara Warf, University of North Carolina School of Law


1:30 PM -
3:15 PM

Friday, July 30

WORKSHOP ON ADVANCEMENT
Discussion Group: Best Practices in Engaging Donors & Potential Donors

Donor engagement is key to your fundraising success. Sounds easy, but is it? In this session, you will hear how to involve your donors in the life of the law school in a meaningful way. You will learn how to attract potential donors to partner with you, your students, and your faculty. You will also receive examples of how to keep these donors engaged for the long haul.

Moderators: Ms. Renee Bush, George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School, Assistant Dean for Development & Alumni Relations; Assistant Dean Wanda Hoover, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law

Discussants: Dean Michael Barry, South Texas College of Law Houston; Ms. Florentina Butler, Washington and Lee University School of Law, Associate Director of Law Advancement; Ms. Tory Gaddy, University of Arkansas School of Law, Director of Development; Dean J. Rich Leonard, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law; Ms. Suzette Matthews, The University of Mississippi School of Law, Senior Director of Development


1:30 PM -
3:15 PM

Friday, July 30

WORKS-IN-PROGRESS WORKSHOP
Criminal Law

This workshop gives participants the opportunity to present a work-in-progress and receive feedback.

Moderator: Professor Kendra Haurd Fershee, Creighton University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Mark Drumbl, Washington and Lee University School of Law, Exposing Collaborators: Stories and Sentiments Starting in Communist Prague; Professor Lauryn P. Gouldin, Syracuse University College of Law, Specific Suspicion; Professor Anna Offit, SMU Dedman School of Law, Religious Convictions


1:30 PM -
3:15 PM

Friday, July 30

WORKS-IN-PROGRESS WORKSHOP
Criminal Law

This workshop gives participants the opportunity to present a work-in-progress and receive feedback on their work.

Moderator: Professor Julia Belian, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law

Speakers: Professor Miriam Baer, Brooklyn Law School, Myths and Misunderstandings in White Collar Crime; Professor Zachary Kaufman, University of Houston Law Center, Police Bystanders and Upstanders; Professor Melanie Reid, Lincoln Memorial University Duncan School of Law, The Impact of Autonomous Driving and Artificial Intelligence on Road Surveillance Evidence; Professor Erin Sheley, The University of California Western School of Law, The Dignitary Confrontation Clause; Professor Madalyn Wasilczuk, University of South Carolina School of Law, Trauma, Generational Harm, and the Law of Racialized Policing


3:15 PM -
3:30 PM

Friday, July 30

Break (sponsored by Carolina Academic Press)


3:30 PM -
5:30 PM

Friday, July 30

WRITING CONNECTIONS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Discipline Building: Professional Identity Formation

This Discussion Group seeks to promote conversation around law students’ socialization to the legal profession such as their ability to understand how culture impacts the law, legal relations, and the lawyering process; how assessment practices impact student motivation and success, and how to address curricular shortcomings in developing cultural competency and self-awareness.

Moderator: Professor Suzanna Geiser, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law

Discussants: Professor Renee Allen, St. John's University School of Law; Professor Tiffany Atkins, Elon University School of Law; Ms. Sara Berman, AccessLex Institute; Professor Stephanie Hartung, Northeastern University School of Law; Professor Jean Mangan, University of Georgia School of Law; Professor Rosemary Queenan, Albany Law School; Professor Anne Ralph, The Ohio State University, Moritz College of Law; Professor Suzanne Rowe, University of Oregon School of Law; Professor Rebecca Scharf, University of Nevada, Las Vegas William S. Boyd School of Law; Professor Danielle Tully, Brooklyn Law School; Professor Laura Webb, University of Richmond School of Law; Professor Melissa H. Weresh, Drake University Law School


3:30 PM -
6:00 PM

Friday, July 30

WORKSHOP ON LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW
Discussion Group: Contract Issues in Employment Law

Employment is a contractual relationship, and many of the disputes between employers and employees involve contract disputes. But employment contracts have features and present problems that are peculiar to employment. This panel will discuss a number of topics related to employment contracts, including the question whether handbooks and policies are contracts, the effect of disclaimers, the enforceability of contracts for non-competition or to protect data, and the enforceability of arbitration agreements.

Moderator: Professor Richard Carlson, South Texas College of Law Houston

Discussants: Professor Rachel Arnow-Richman, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law; Professor Scott Bauries, University of Kentucky College of Law; Professor Robert Brain, LMU Loyola Law School; Professor Miriam Cherry, Saint Louis University School of Law; Professor Jeffrey Hirsch, University of North Carolina School of Law; Professor Nicole Porter, University of Toledo College of Law; Professor John Rice, Duquesne University School of Law; Professor Kerri Stone, Florida International University College of Law


3:30 PM -
6:30 PM

Friday, July 30

WORKSHOP FOR ASSOCIATE DEANS FOR RESEARCH
Discussion Group: Faculty Research & Development Deans—Promoting Scholarship in Challenging Times

This roundtable discussion addresses how faculty deans can develop and apply the skills essential for their work and their faculties. Particular attention is paid to how associate deans lead effectively, how institutions best promote faculty scholarship, and how an institution should develop strategies based on institutional and individual challenges. The group seeks to address specific questions along these topics, including how to craft ideal strategies for guiding faculty (individually and collectively), how institutions should market their work to a diverse array of constituent audiences, and how a mentorship relationship interacts with the committee on promotion and tenure.

Moderator: Professor Ronald Krotoszynski, The University of Alabama School of Law

Discussants: Professor Shima Baughman, The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law; Professor Michael Higdon, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Edward Janger, Brooklyn Law School; Professor Linda Jellum, Mercer University School of Law; Professor Melanie Reid, Lincoln Memorial University Duncan School of Law


3:30 PM -
6:30 PM

Friday, July 30

Discussion Group: Reorganizing, Restructuring, and Reforming the Federal Courts
This discussion group considers issues and proposals for reorganizing, restructuring, and reforming the Supreme Court and the federal courts. Following the failure to confirm Merrick Garland in 2016 and the appointment of Amy Coney Barrett in the weeks before the 2020 election, reforming the Supreme Court and the federal judiciary rose to the political agenda. A broad range of proposals have circulated among legal scholars, activists, and elected officials, including: expanding the size of the Supreme Court; imposing term limits; reworking how judges are placed on the Court; creating party seats; and adding lower-court judges. As a discussion group, the program will allow for a number and broad range of voices on the issues.

Moderator: Professor Howard Wasserman, Florida International University College of Law

Discussants: Professor Michael Dimino, Widener University Commonwealth Law School; Professor Scott Dodson, University of California Hastings College of the Law; Professor Daniel Epps, Washington University School of Law; Professor Amanda Frost, American University, Washington College of Law; Professor Corinna Lain, University of Richmond School of Law; Professor Linda Malone, William & Mary Law School; Professor Thomas Metzloff, Duke University School of Law; Professor Lori Ringhand, University of Georgia School of Law; Professor Eric Segall, Georgia State University College of Law; Professor Ilya Somin, George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School


3:30 PM -
6:30 PM

Friday, July 30

Discussion Group: T&E Scholarship Discussion Group - Current and Evolving Trusts & Estates Scholarship
Scholarship in the Trusts & Estates field is dynamic and expanding. Until recently, trusts and estates law primarily concerned mechanisms for the effective transfer of wealth and it was the province of dry formalities. There was widespread consensus over a series of core principles and concepts basic to the field. New scholarship, however, seeks to challenge this traditional approach and to bring alternative perspectives to the core meanings and concepts of trusts and estates. The scholarship today uses a variety of methodologies and lenses. In this discussion group, participants have an opportunity to present their current research and explore symmetries and differences between their various scholarly projects.

Moderator: Professor Victoria  Haneman, Creighton University School of Law

Discussants: Professor Taleed El-Sabawi, Elon University School of Law; Professor Emily Grant, Washburn University School of Law; Professor Michael Higdon, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Samuel Kan, Barry University, Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law; Professor Karen Sneddon, Mercer University School of Law; Professor Carla Spivack, Oklahoma City University School of Law; Professor Allison Tait, University of Richmond School of Law; Professor Phyllis Taite, Florida A&M University College of Law; Professor Reid Weisbord, Rutgers Law School (Newark)


3:30 PM -
6:30 PM

Friday, July 30

WORKSHOP ON TAX LAW
Discussion Group: Tax Law

This discussion group is broadly concerned with issues of taxation. Discussants will address individual income tax, corporate income tax, state & local tax, estate & gift tax, tax expenditure policy, international tax, and entitlements. While these disparate themes might seem only loosely related, a common thread of the difficulties of balancing equity, simplicity, incentives, and transparency runs through all of them. These scholars grapple with the central tax topics of the day, and address the looming concerns that must be dealt with by all levels of government.

Moderator: Professor Tessa  Davis, University of South Carolina School of Law

Discussants: Professor David Gamage, Indiana University Maurer School of Law; Professor Victoria J. Haneman, Creighton University School of Law; Professor Young Ran (Christine) Kim, The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law; Professor Diane J. Klein, University of La Verne College of Law; Professor Leandra Lederman, Indiana University Maurer School of Law; Professor Blaine Saito, Northeastern University School of Law; Professor Eric Smith, Weber State University, School of Business; Professor Adam Thimmesch, University of Nebraska College of Law; Professor Eleanor Wilking, Cornell Law School


7:30 PM -
10:00 PM

Friday, July 30

Legal Philology Cocktail Reception
Maybell Romero (Tulane) and Brian Frye (Kentucky) are hosting this cocktail reception for anyone with an interest in legal philology. There may or may not be a wedding at the start of the event. Attend to find out.


Saturday, July 31

8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Saturday, July 31

WORKS-IN-PROGRESS WORKSHOP
Private Law

This workshop gives participants the opportunity to present a work-in-progress and receive feedback.

Moderator: Professor Darren Bush, University of Houston Law Center

Speakers: Professor Nick Davrados, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law, Proper Law to the Succession; Professor Edward W. De Barbieri, Albany Law School, A Small Claims Court Remedy to Breach of the Warranty of Habitability; Professor Kevin R. Douglas, Michigan State University College of Law, How Creepy Concepts Undermine Effective Insider Trading Reform; Professor Jill Fisch, University of Pennsylvania Law School, GameStop and the Resurgence of the Retail Investor; Professor David Kwok, University of Houston Law Center, Corporate Religion Transparency; Professor Robert Rhee, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law, The Irrelevance of Delaware Corporate Law


8:00 AM -
10:00 AM

Saturday, July 31

WORKSHOP ON ACADEMIC FREEDOM IN AN ERA OF CHANGE
Academic Freedom in an Era of Change

Academic Freedom is a core principle and value of higher education in the United States and other countries. It embodies important rights and responsibilities, and it can be threatened or infringed in various ways, such as due to political or institutional pressures. In addition, focus on academic freedom can become subsumed or entangled with challenging issues of free speech on campus. This panel will address rights and responsibilities of academic freedom, how it interplays with freedom of speech, and the impact of academic freedom for law faculty, staff, and students.

Moderator: Professor Marc Roark, Southern University Law Center

Speakers: Professor Todd Berger, Syracuse University College of Law; Professor Anne Klebes-Pelissier, Roger Williams University School of Law; Professor Katherine Macfarlane, Southern University Law Center


9:00 AM -
12:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

WORKSHOP ON TAX LAW
Tax Law, Policy, and Human Beings

Sometimes we forget, but real live human beings (and dead ones!) are subject to the income tax. The presenters on this panel consider the myriad ways that the income tax responds to and is shaped by the choices human beings make. In particular, papers in this panel address the rise of telework, the effect of the tax system on the cost of death, tax and the cyborg, and the human factor in the economic calculus.

Moderator: Professor Carla Spivack, Oklahoma City University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Tessa R. Davis, University of South Carolina School of Law; Professor Victoria J. Haneman, Creighton University School of Law; Professor Young Ran (Christine) Kim, The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law; Professor Phyllis Taite, Florida A&M University College of Law; Professor Richard Winchester, Seton Hall University School of Law


9:00 AM -
12:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

WORKSHOP ON LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW
Discussion Group: Post-Election Preview: Labor and Employment Law under a New Biden Administration

There is a strong consensus that the Trump Administration had a negative impact on the interests and rights of organized labor and on more general workplace protections and equality. What will it mean for the field of labor and employment law to have a Democratic President and a Democratic-controlled Congress? This discussion group explores how the Biden Administration might influence labor and employment laws. It previews both what we expect might happen and what we hope will happen with respect to legislative, regulatory, and executive reforms.

Moderator: Professor Nicole Porter, University of Toledo College of Law

Discussants: Professor Richard Carlson, South Texas College of Law Houston; Professor Miriam Cherry, Saint Louis University School of Law; Professor Jeffrey Hirsch, University of North Carolina School of Law; Professor Marcia McCormick, Saint Louis University School of Law; Professor Kerri Stone, Florida International University College of Law; Professor Jamillah Williams, Georgetown University Law Center


9:00 AM -
12:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

WORKSHOP ON CIVIL PROCEDURE
Discussion Group: Civil Procedure Roundtable on Adjudication

The adjudication process is constantly evolving, including the pandemic-related shift to predominantly virtual proceedings. The pretrial stage continues to be emphasized under both Twiqbal's stringent pleading regime and recent federal rules changes, including major discovery revisions. State legislatures are superseding prior state common-law doctrine in statutory enactments that intermix substance and procedure, resulting in new Erie issues in federal courts. Challenges are arising in the rare cases reaching a jury verdict regarding impeaching the jury's deliberations and the deference to be afforded to the jury's verdict. The appropriate scope of remedial relief at the end of the adjudication process is also subject to continuing debate. This discussion group will address such current procedural issues related to the adjudication process.

Moderators: Professor Richard Freer, Emory University School of Law; Professor Charles Rhodes, South Texas College of Law Houston

Discussants: Professor Scott Dodson, University of California Hastings College of the Law; Professor Seth Endo, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law; Professor Andrew Hammond, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law; Professor Thomas Metzloff, Duke University School of Law; Professor Michael T. Morley, Florida State University College of Law; Professor Jeffrey Parness, Northern Illinois University College of Law; Professor Howard Wasserman, Florida International University College of Law


9:30 AM -
10:00 AM

Saturday, July 31

MINDFULNESS WORKSHOP
Registration


10:00 AM -
10:15 AM

Saturday, July 31

Break (sponsored by Wolters Kluwer)


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

Discussion Group: Current Issues in Immigration
The narrative was “us versus them.” Rightful U.S. citizens versus the invading masses. These contrasting depictions were arguably a national obsession with the election of Donald Trump in 2016, and what many believe was his unrelenting verbal and policy war against immigrants while in office. He began his presidential bid by targeting Mexican immigrants, and since taking office, his rhetoric concerning tough immigration policies were purported to be a top priority for his administration. Trump used this sort of theater to create nationalistic fervor amongst U.S. citizens, and to demonize the so-called invasion at our borders. Now that Trump lost is it really a new day for immigrants and immigration reform?

Moderator: Professor Ediberto Roman, Florida International University College of Law

Discussants: Professor Robert Barsky, Vanderbilt Law School; Professor Matt Boaz, Washington and Lee University School of Law; Professor Emile Loza de Siles, Duquesne University School of Law; Professor Daniel Morales, University of New Hampshire School of Law; Professor Diane Uchimiya, Creighton University School of Law


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

ELFA Perspectives on Teaching During the Covid-19 Era
This panel focuses on the European Law Faculty Association's (ELFA) experience of teaching during the COVID era, focusing on issues such as teaching, financing and cooperation. This panel will cover the following topics: cooperation between law faculties in the COVID era; adjusting to digital teaching and student support in the COVID era; adaptation to exceptionality in Law Schools; organizational challenges created by the pandemic (the Spanish case); advantages and disadvantages of online teaching to law students; new opportunities created by the Covid-19 Pandemic; & the financing Of legal education In The covid era.

Moderator: Professor Patrick Hugg, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law

Speakers: Professor Manuel Bermejo Castrillo, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Spain); Professor Jivko Draganov, University of World & National Economy Sofia (Bulgaria); Professor Michele Graziadei, University of Turn Department of Law (Italy); Professor Marek Grzybowski, Warsaw University Faculty of Law & Administration (Poland); Professor Julian Lonbay, University of Birmingham Faculty of Law (United Kingdom)


10:15 AM -
12:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

WRITING CONNECTIONS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Discipline Building: Interrogating and Disrupting the Legal Writing Canon

This Discussion Group will follow a panel that examines how traditional legal rhetoric perpetuates and reinforces systems of privilege and power and will introduce comparative and critical rhetoric as tools by which those systems may be interrogated and disrupted. This Discussion Group seeks to engage in conversations around such questions as “Why IRAC and the legal syllogism?”; “What alternatives to IRAC and the legal syllogism exist?”; and “From a pedagogical standpoint, what are the shortcomings we see in traditional legal rhetoric?” to name just a few.

Moderator: Professor Kirsten  Davis, Stetson University College of Law

Discussants: Professor Elizabeth Berenguer, Stetson University College of Law; Professor Lucy Jewel, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Sherri Keene, University of Georgetown University Law Center; Professor Carol R. Mallory, Northeastern University School of Law; Professor Susan A McMahon, Arizona State University Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law; Professor Teri McMurtry-Chubb, University of Illinois Chicago School of Law; Professor Anne Mullins, Stetson University College of Law; Professor Danielle Tully, Brooklyn Law School; Dean Tara Willke, Duquesne University School of Law


10:15 AM -
12:45 PM

Saturday, July 31

MINDFULNESS WORKSHOP
New Reality and Mindfulness in Law Schools

Speakers will address ways of introducing and using mindfulness as a teaching and learning tool inside and outside the classroom and will share examples of best practices, focusing on how it became especially pertinent considering the new reality. The discussion will also include the issues of self-reflection and cognitive functioning.

Moderator: Professor Katerina Lewinbuk, South Texas College of Law Houston

Speakers: Professor Glen-Peter Ahlers, Barry University, Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law; Professor Mary Beth Beazley, University of Nevada, Las Vegas William S. Boyd School of Law; Professor Shailini George, Suffolk University Law School; Professor Rosario Lozada, Florida International University College of Law


12:00 PM -
1:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

WOLTERS KLUWER LUNCHEON: INTRODUCING THE NEW CONNECTED EBOOK
Connected Casebooks are now called Connected eBooks, and the name is not the only thing changing.

Join Nicole Pinard, Maureen Kenealy, and Valerie Saeger of Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory for a delicious lunch on Saturday July 31st in Magnolia D and be the first to see the new and improved CasebookConnect experience coming later this summer. CasebookConnect is a platform of complementary learning tools created to help law students learn more efficiently and effectively through formative assessments (Connected Quizzing), enhanced digital textbooks (Connected eBooks), practice questions (Study Center), and animated videos (PracticePerfect). During the presentation, you will learn about how students are using technology to prepare for class, assess their understanding of material, and improve their outcomes using CasebookConnect. Our presenters will share insights collected from research with law students—including how students are using digitally-enhanced textbooks today and how the new CasebookConnect experience is designed to further promote student engagement and learning. You’ll also get a sneak peak of upcoming professor capabilities to engage your students.

Speakers: Ms. Maureen Kenealy, Wolters Kluwer Publishing, Director, Digital Learning & Engagement, Legal Education; Ms. Nicole Pinard, Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory, U.S., Vice-President & General Manager, Legal Education; Ms. Valerie Saeger, Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory, U.S., Technology Product Manager, Legal Education


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Saturday, July 31

The ELPIS Approach: How the Pandemic Changed the Face of Law, as Well as Law Teaching and Learning
ELPIS is one of the oldest and biggest Law networks in Europe, founded by the Leibiniz University of Hannover, composed of 34 European Law Faculties together with associated faculties from America, Asia and Africa. The network deals with issues relating to Students, Professors and Staff members, as well as questions related to pedagogical theory and practice. ELPIS is currently divided into three branches: ELPIS organizes an Annual Meeting; ELPIS offers a joint masters degree that includes the law faculties of Hannover, Rouen, Lisbon, Fribourg and Mykolos Romeris (Vilnius); the ELPIS Research arm that runs research and scientific projects and a v-Law Review. In the last 2 years the ELPIS network has organized some scientific events and a special volume of the ELPIS v-Law Review which was dedicated to the changes that the pandemic brought to a law, as well as to law teaching and learning, and about the predictable consequences of these novelties for the near future. And these are precisely the topics we will present and discuss in this panel.

Moderator: Professor Vasco Pereira da Silva, University of Lisbon Faculty of Law (Portugal), & Chair, Elpis Network,

Speakers: Professor Fransisco Balaguer Callejón, The University of University of Granada Faculty of Law (Spain); Professor Nuno Cunha Rodriguez, University of Lisbon Faculty of Law (Portugal), & Vice-President, European Institute; Professor Class Friedrich Germelmann, University of Hanover Faculty of Law (Germany), & Faculty Coordinator for International Relations; Dean Bernd Opperman, University of Hanover Faculty of Law (Germany), & Former ELPIS Chair.


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Saturday, July 31

Bias and Disparate Outcomes in the Bar Examination
This panel will discuss how bar examinees from communities of color or who are neurodivergent (including examinees with learning disabilities and mental health challenges) are adversely affected by bias in the bar exam. Studies show that bar examinees from communities of color have lower pass rates than their white peers. Neurodivergent examinees encounter a range of impediments to success on the bar resulting in their underperforming their neurotypical peers. If the legal profession is to be more representative of the population as a whole, it must eliminate artificial barriers that act to reinforce racial and neurological biases. This panel seeks to help expand the conversation about these problems so we may, as a community, work together to solve them.

Moderator: Professor Scott DeVito, Ave Maria School of Law

Speakers: Professor Andi Curcio, Georgia State University College of Law; Professor David A. Green, North Carolina Central University School of Law; Professor Erin Lain, Drake University Law School; Professor Reginald J. Mitchell, Sr., Florida A&M University College of Law; Ms. Haley Moss, Haley Moss LLC


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Saturday, July 31

The Evolution of Legal Storytelling
Lawyers have used storytelling for some time to get judges’ attention and to further their clients’ cases. But as these techniques have become widespread and accepted as effective methods of legal advocacy and forms of legal reasoning, their use has evolved. Panelists will discuss the evolution of contemporary storytelling and narrative techniques by lawyers and judges alike. In particular, panelists will consider the relationship between the law and the advocate’s ability to tell an effective story, how courts use narrative in decision-making, and whether and how these uses of narrative advance or obscure the search for justice.

Speakers: Professor Robert Barsky, Vanderbilt Law School; Professor Sherri Keene, University of Georgetown University Law Center; Professor Jennifer Sheppard, U.S. Air Force Academy; Professor Karen Sneddon, Mercer University School of Law


1:00 PM -
2:45 PM

Saturday, July 31

Helping International Students Succeed at American Law Schools: Overcoming Cultural and Other Challenges
Law schools have LLM programs for international students as well as students in their JD programs from countries other than the United States. International students matriculating at American law schools face a unique set of challenges, including language differences, cultural and political acclamation, as well the need to adopt new and different study habits. Faculty mentors, student mentors, and program directors play an important role in terms of helping these students navigate life in a new country and educational environment. This panel will discuss the types of issues intentional students face when attending American law schools and how we can help students address those concerns and ensure student success.

Moderator: Professor Todd Berger, Syracuse University College of Law

Speakers: Professor Clémence Kucera, University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law; Professor Thomas Metzloff, Duke University School of Law; Professor Shannon Ryan, Syracuse University College of Law; Professor Kirsten Schaetzel, Emory University School of Law; Ms. Shannon Sevier, St. Mary's University School of Law


2:45 PM -
3:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

Break (sponsored by Wolters Kluwer)


3:00 PM -
5:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

WRITING CONNECTIONS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Discipline Building: Balance in the Age of Chaos

The Discussion group will examine the teaching, institutional, and personal challenges that faculty at varying stages in their careers have encountered since the pandemic began, and it will seek to offer perspective, advice, and resources on how to cope with these challenges.

Moderator: Professor Jane Cross, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law

Discussants: Professor Heather Baxter, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Alexa Chew, University of North Carolina School of Law; Professor John Cook, University of North Dakota School of Law; Professor Melissa Eckhause, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law; Professor Stevie Leahy, Northeastern University School of Law; Professor Rosario Lozada, Florida International University College of Law; Professor Jean Mangan, University of Georgia School of Law; Professor Cathren Page, Mercer University School of Law; Professor Michelle Richards, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law; Professor O.J. Salinas, University of North Carolina School of Law; Professor Elizabeth Sherowski, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law; Professor Saleema Snow, University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law; Professor Nancy Soonpaa, Texas Tech University School of Law


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

WORKSHOP ON ACADEMIC FREEDOM IN AN ERA OF CHANGE
Discussion Group: Academic Freedom Around the Globe

Academic Freedom can face political, cultural, institutional, and economic pressures, and these dynamics can vary from country to country, or even across regions or jurisdictions within a country. In particular, restrictions on academic freedom can be used to stifle political dissent through both censorship and self-censorship, and thus present both human rights and anti-democratic concerns. This discussion group will bring together law faculty from various countries for a comparative discussion of threats to academic freedom; the relationship between academic freedom and personal statements or political activism; the political, cultural, institutional, and economic implications of working in restrictive environments; and steps that might be considered to protect academic freedom.

Moderator: Professor Jennifer Weil Bard, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law

Discussants: Professor Enrique Weil Afonso, University of Silesia (Poland); Professor Todd Berger, Syracuse University College of Law; Professor Rafal Blicharz, University of Silesia (Poland); Dean Gregory Bowman, Roger Williams University School of Law; Professor Gaya Davidyan, Moscow State University Faculty of Law (Russia); Professor Patrick Hugg, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law; Professor Christopher Kelley, University of Arkansas School of Law; Professor Anne Klebes-Pelissier, Roger Williams University School of Law; Professor Vasco Pereira da Silva, University of Lisbon Faculty of Law (Portugal), & Chair, Elpis Network,; Professor Mikolaj Pietrzyk, University of Silesia (Poland); Professor Małgorzata Pohl Michałek, University of Silesia (Poland); Professor Russell Weaver, University of Louisville, Louis D. Brandeis School of Law


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

WORKSHOP ON CIVIL PROCEDURE
Discussion Group: Civil Procedure Roundtable: Jurisdiction and Court Access

The roadblocks to court access are a perennial concern for procedural scholars. Personal jurisdiction limitations, the hegemony of contract over court access with both arbitration and, to a lesser degree, forum selection clauses, class actions reforms, and the crushing centralization of MDL are frequent obstacles to plaintiffs securing convenient forums to assert their claims. Of particular note this year is the Supreme Court's upcoming decision in Ford Motor Co. v. Montana Eighth Judicial District Court, which presumably will provide some guidance on personal jurisdiction's nexus requirement. Yet undoubtedly additional doctrinal and theoretical issues will remain after Ford. This discussion group will provide an opportunity for procedural scholars to address jurisdictional issues and other roadblocks to accessing a convenient forum.

Moderator: Professor Thomas Metzloff, Duke University School of Law

Discussants: Professor Scott Dodson, University of California Hastings College of the Law; Professor Seth Endo, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law; Professor Richard Freer, Emory University School of Law; Professor Andrew Hammond, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law; Professor Samuel Jordan, Saint Louis University School of Law; Professor Jeffrey Parness, Northern Illinois University College of Law; Professor Charles Rhodes, South Texas College of Law Houston; Professor Adam Steinman, The University of Alabama School of Law; Professor Howard Wasserman, Florida International University College of Law


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

WORKSHOP ON LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW
Discussion Group: COVID-19 and Worklaw

This discussion will examine the numerous impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the workplace. The issues implicated by COVID-19 include the negative impacts on employment for women and people of color; unemployment benefits; family and medical leave; occupational safety and health enforcement; determining which workers should be entitled to protection under work laws; stranded merchant seafarers; changes in NLRB election and other procedures; and the role of at-will employment in vaccine mandates and other employer responses to the pandemic.

Moderator: Professor Jeffrey Hirsch, University of North Carolina School of Law

Discussants: Professor Scott Bauries, University of Kentucky College of Law; Professor Theresa Beiner, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law; Professor Anastasia Boles, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law; Professor Susan Carle, American University, Washington College of Law; Professor Richard Carlson, South Texas College of Law Houston; Professor Miriam Cherry, Saint Louis University School of Law; Professor Ruben J. Garcia, University of Nevada, Las Vegas William S. Boyd School of Law; Professor Nicole Porter, University of Toledo College of Law; Professor Ani Satz, Emory University School of Law; Professor Kerri Stone, Florida International University College of Law; Professor Jamillah Williams, Georgetown University Law Center


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

Discussion Group: Feeling Property
Despite the rational-choice discourse that dominates property scholarship and judicial opinions, owners’ conduct is often governed by something unruly and unspoken—feelings. The law of ownership is shot through with litigation over spite fences, border disputes, spring guns, and fox carcasses, much of which beggars rational-choice explanation. Yet law-and-emotions insights have failed to migrate into the property discourse. The connection to emotion in this context is particularly salient, since ownership is bound up with notions of home, safety, personal history, wealth, status, and identity so that any legal allocation or denial of property rights impacts the emotions. This discussion group will investigate the inevitable connection between property law and human feelings, and to explore what law should do about it.

Moderator: Professor Marc Roark, Southern University Law Center

Discussants: Professor Bram Akkermans, University of Maastricht; Professor Rishi Batra, U.S. Air Force Academy; Professor Rafael Ibarra Garza, Direcciòn de Investigación Universidad de Monterrey; Professor Jamila Jefferson-Jones, Wayne State University Law School; Professor Hila Keren, Southwestern University Law School; Professor Diane J. Klein, University of La Verne College of Law; Professor Alina Ng Boyte, Mississippi College School of Law; Professor Jessica Shoemaker, University of Nebraska College of Law


3:00 PM -
6:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

Discussion Group: Reproductive Justice Scholarship & Pedagogy Discussion Group
As both the political and scientific landscape rapidly shift, issues of reproductive justice are increasingly complicated and urgent. Additionally, scholarly interest in reproductive justice has expanded beyond traditional reproductive rights topics into a broader array of areas that better reflect the variation in the lived experiences of individuals. The participants will discuss their own scholarly or pedagogical approaches to reproductive justice issues, areas of overlap and divergence, and areas for future inquiry, as well as invite audience participation and discussion.

Moderator: Professor Meghan Boone, Wake Forest University School of Law

Discussants: Professor Johanna Bond, Washington and Lee University School of Law; Professor Greer Donley, University of Pittsburgh School of Law; Professor Laura Lane-Steele, Tulane University Law School; Dean Browne Lewis, North Carolina Central University School of Law; Professor Seema Mohapatra, SMU Dedman School of Law; Professor Jeffrey Parness, Northern Illinois University College of Law; Professor Rachel Rebouche, Temple University, James E. Beasley School of Law


4:30 PM -
6:30 PM

Saturday, July 31

MINDFULNESS WORKSHOP
Mini-Retreat


6:00 PM -
7:00 PM

Saturday, July 31

Carolina Academic Press Closing Reception


7:30 PM -
8:30 PM

Saturday, July 31

Federalist Society Desser Reception


Sunday, August 1

9:00 AM -
11:00 AM

Sunday, August 1

WRITING CONNECTIONS WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Discipline Building: Scholarship and Status in the Legal Academy

This Discussion Group seeks to encourage conversations about developing a scholarly agenda, adopting processes for serious scholarly inquiry, and promoting scholarly achievements within the legal writing community. It will engage questions like “What is legal writing scholarship?”; “How can we ensure legal writing scholars are taken more seriously within academia as a whole?”; and “What does it mean to be a serious scholar?”

Moderator: Professor Karen Sneddon, Mercer University School of Law

Discussants: Professor Heather Baxter, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law; Professor Megan Boyd, Georgia State University College of Law; Professor John Cook, University of North Dakota School of Law; Professor Kirsten K. Davis, Stetson University College of Law; Professor Sherri Keene, University of Georgetown University Law Center; Professor Paula Manning, University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law; Professor Sue Provenzano, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law; Professor Anne Ralph, The Ohio State University, Moritz College of Law; Professor Michelle Richards, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law; Professor Jennifer Sheppard, U.S. Air Force Academy; Professor Elizabeth Sherowski, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law; Professor Melissa H. Weresh, Drake University Law School


9:00 AM -
11:00 AM

Sunday, August 1

WORKSHOP ON BUSINESS LAW
Discussion Group: Insider Trading and Markets

Although the received policy underpinnings of insider trading regulation in the United States focus on deception the deception of individuals, commentators have argued that both investors and markets are harmed by it. Accordingly, as Congress considers statutory reforms to insider trading law, it is important to consider how insider trading affects share pricing, access to capital, liquidity, market volatility, market confidence, the flow of information, and other market-related concerns. If the principal harms of insider trading are imposed on markets rather than individuals, then any proposed reform should reflect this reality. At a minimum, reform should reflect inevitable trade offs between the values of fairness, equity, and efficiency. This discussion group will address these and other related questions.

Moderators: Professor John Anderson, Mississippi College School of Law; Professor Joan Heminway, The University of Tennessee College of Law

Discussants: Professor Miriam Baer, Brooklyn Law School; Professor Eric Chaffee, University of Toledo College of Law; Professor Kevin Douglas, Michigan State University College of Law; Professor Jill Fisch, University of Pennsylvania Law School; Professor Michael Guttentag, LMU Loyola Law School; Professor Jeremy Kidd, Drake University Law School; Professor George Mocsary, University of Wyoming College of Law; Professor Ellen Podgor, Stetson University College of Law; Professor David Rosenfeld, Northern Illinois University College of Law; Professor Karen Woody, Washington and Lee University School of Law


9:00 AM -
11:30 AM

Sunday, August 1

WORKSHOP ON LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW
Discussion Group: Pedagogical Trends in Teaching Employment Discrimination

Pedagogical Trends and Techniques in Employment Discrimination: This discussion group focuses on best practices for teaching Employment Discrimination. Because this area of law so often resonates with or is altered by current events that unfold during a semester, it is vital to keep students abreast of developments and to be able to seamlessly integrate those developments into a pre-set syllabus. The discussion focuses on 1) best practices employed by professors in this area to keep classes fresh, current, and flowing; 2) examples of when and how current events have been successfully integrated into a class discussion or syllabus; and 3) new and innovative ideas when it comes to the selection of assigned course material; teaching, and discussion-leading for classes.

Moderator: Professor Kerri Stone, Florida International University College of Law

Discussants: Professor Richard Carlson, South Texas College of Law Houston; Professor Miriam Cherry, Saint Louis University School of Law; Professor Llezlie Green, American University, Washington College of Law; Professor Jeffrey Hirsch, University of North Carolina School of Law; Professor Nicole Porter, University of Toledo College of Law; Professor Ani Satz, Emory University School of Law


9:00 AM -
12:00 PM

Sunday, August 1

Discussion Group: New and Established Voices in Criminal Procedure
This discussion group is a forum for new and established scholars to discuss their forthcoming articles, works in progress, and ideas for articles on constitutional criminal procedure.

Moderator: Professor Nicholas Kahn-Fogel, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law

Discussants: Professor Terrence Cain, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law; Dean Brian Gallini, Willamette University College of Law; Professor Lauryn P. Gouldin, Syracuse University College of Law; Professor Corinna Lain, University of Richmond School of Law; Professor Suparna Malempati, Atlanta's John Marshall Law School; Professor Luke Milligan, University of Louisville, Louis D. Brandeis School of Law; Professor Jennifer Moore, Desales University; Professor Wesley Oliver, Duquesne University School of Law; Professor Brian Owsley, University of North Texas Dallas College of Law; Professor Melanie Reid, Lincoln Memorial University Duncan School of Law; Professor Jacob Schuman, Penn State Law; Professor Matt Tokson, The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law; Professor Michael Vitiello, University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law; Professor Melanie Wilson, The University of Tennessee College of Law


9:00 AM -
12:00 PM

Sunday, August 1

Discussion Group: Family Law Scholarship (& Beyond)
Scholarship in family law is dynamic and often overlaps with other areas of the law, including civil rights, civil liberties, health law, feminist jurisprudence, queer theory, employment discrimination, and trusts and estates, among others. This discussion group will provide an opportunity for participants to discuss drafts of their papers that draw upon family law, including those that overlap with other areas of the law. Participants will have an opportunity to explore symmetries and differences between their various scholarly projects, as well as invite audience participation and discussion.

Moderator: Professor Meghan Boone, Wake Forest University School of Law

Discussants: Professor Jeffrey A. Dodge, Penn State Dickinson Law; Professor Jessica Feinberg, University of Maine School of Law; Professor Susan Hazeldean, Brooklyn Law School; Professor Laura Lane-Steele, Tulane University Law School; Professor Lisa Tucker, Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law


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